The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 5

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE

IN FIVE VOLUMES

The Raven Edition




CONTENTS:

Philosophy...

Page 1

... To the River -- Song
...

Page 2

...a thorough
diffusion of the proper feeling. But in America, the coins current being
the sole arms...

Page 3

..._have a
covering of large figures, and that a small one must have a covering
of small--yet...

Page 4

...principles. Its
leading feature is _glitter--_and in that one word how much of all that
is detestable...

Page 5

...with whose decorations no fault can be found. The proprietor
lies asleep on a sofa--the weather...

Page 6

...many a fine work of Art
overtouched. The frames are broad but not deep, and richly...

Page 7

...heathen is unwonted; and fickle-mindedness has ever been an
attribute of the worshippers of Baal."

"'That they...

Page 8

...when
Simeon and his associates arrived on the summit of the tower called
Adoni-Bezek-the loftiest of all...

Page 9

...had already elapsed.

"We shall be too late!" sighed the Pharisee, as at the expiration of
this...

Page 10

...which reached us every morning from the populous city.
Not a day elapsed which did not...

Page 11

...from the volume before me to
the gloom and desolation of the neighboring city. Uplifting my...

Page 12

...accurately traced in glaring white, upon the dark ground of
the body, as if it had...

Page 13

...of error in all human investigations lay in the liability of
the understanding to under-rate or...

Page 14

...anyone so keenly alive to a joke as the king was. He seemed
to live only...

Page 15

...account of his inability to walk as
other men do. In fact, Hop-Frog could only get...

Page 16

...supposed
that everybody had come to a decision on such points. Many had made
up their minds...

Page 17

...laugh was chorused by the
seven.

Hop-Frog also laughed although feebly and somewhat vacantly.

"Come, come," said the...

Page 18

...he, very
tranquilly, and as if he had never tasted wine in his life, "but just
after...

Page 19

...the
ourang-outang was much more efficiently represented by flu. A thick
coating of the latter was accordingly...

Page 20

...to be
beasts of some kind in reality, if not precisely ourang-outangs. Many
of the women swooned...

Page 21

...now, while the whole assembly (the apes included) were convulsed
with laughter, the jester suddenly uttered...

Page 22

...cripple hurled his torch at them, clambered leisurely to the
ceiling, and disappeared through the sky-light.

It...

Page 23

...before
been in a similar situation, and the tumultuous sea of human heads
filled me, therefore, with...

Page 24

...the right
ears, long used to pen-holding, had an odd habit of standing off on
end. I...

Page 25

...all
kinds and of all ages--the unequivocal beauty in the prime of her
womanhood, putting one in...

Page 26

...countenance which
at once arrested and absorbed my whole attention, on account of the
absolute idiosyncrasy of...

Page 27

...fear of losing sight of him. Never
once turning his head to look back, he did...

Page 28

...watched him. He entered shop after shop, priced nothing,
spoke no word, and looked at all...

Page 29

...many and capricious that
scarce the semblance of a passage was discernible between them.
The paving-stones lay...

Page 30

...alone. [page 228:] He is the man of the crowd. It will be in vain...

Page 31

...ground, therefore, for the charge brought against me by
certain ignoramuses--that I have never written a...

Page 32

...my knees forthwith, and, uplifting my
voice, made prophecy of his ruin.

The fact is that his...

Page 33

...what you please," or "I'll bet you
what you dare," or "I'll bet you a trifle,"...

Page 34

...alarmed for the consequences.
Then, applying his thumb to his nose, he thought proper to make...

Page 35

...way of protection from the weather, and
the archway, having but few windows, was thus very...

Page 36

...venerable aspect. Nothing could be more reverend
than his whole appearance; for he not only had...

Page 37

...all the while straight up in his face with an air of the most
unadulterated benignity...

Page 38

...the
old gentleman to make any other gentleman jump? The little old
dot-and-carry-one! who is he? If...

Page 39

...neck of my
unfortunate friend had come precisely in contact.

He did not long survive his terrible...

Page 40

...that looked you always
straight in the face, as much as to say: "I have a...

Page 41

...sad habit of swearing, although he seldom went beyond "Od rot me," or
"By gosh," or...

Page 42

...in the business
"until something should turn up," as the honest old gentleman worded
it; and I...

Page 43

...was the most
injudicious plan that could be pursued. Convince them, however, he
did--all except Mr. Pennifeather,...

Page 44

...having
been worn by its owner on the very morning of Mr. Shuttleworthy's
departure for the city;...

Page 45

...in the good opinion of his audience, had the effect to deepen
the suspicion already attached...

Page 46

...been
counteracted by the hope of reinstation into the good graces of the
uncle. But the will...

Page 47

...Goodfellow's), that
his object in going to town on the morrow was to make a deposit...

Page 48

...committed the prisoner for
trial-declining resolutely to take any bail in the case, although
against this severity...

Page 49

..."Your most ob'nt ser'ts,
...

Page 50

...which were demolished in the scuffle. "Old Charley," who was
pretty much intoxicated, and excessively red...

Page 51

...slung the corpse of Mr.
Shuttleworthy, and thus bore it to a secure place of concealment...

Page 52

...it so happened that I had overheard the colloquy between the two
cronies, when Mr. Goodfellow...

Page 53

...which all the ladies fall in love
wid me. Isn't it my own swate silf now...

Page 54

...was making up me mind
whither it wouldn't be the purlite thing to sind a bit...

Page 55

..."Mrs. Tracle," and thin I made
sich an illigant obaysance that it wud ha quite althegither...

Page 56

...squazing of my flipper right full in the sight of that little
furrenner Frinchman, Mounseer Maiter-di-dauns."

Wid...

Page 57

...mavourneen, and it's
a proper nate gintleman ye are--that's God's truth," and with that she
opened her...

Page 58

...of his riverence to be afther the minding of a thrifle of a
mistake. Ye may...

Page 59

...would have conceived the possibility of understanding; and
although, while he flourished, there were not wanting...

Page 60

...the bargain should be to his own
proper advantage. Provided a trade could be effected--a trade...

Page 61

...period
of our tale, to enter the sanctum of a man of genius. Bon-Bon was a...

Page 62

...his tout ensemble gave rise to the
remarkable words of Benevenuta, the Improvisatrice of Florence, "that
it...

Page 63

...impetuously down the chimney, shook awfully the
curtains of the philosopher's bed, and disorganized the economy...

Page 64

...the bed, he made a single step toward our hero, while an iron lamp
that depended...

Page 65

...any one of those causes
which might naturally be supposed to have had an influence. Indeed,
Pierre...

Page 66

...farthest corner of the
apartment.

Not so the philosopher; he was too much a man of the...

Page 67

...are
being engendered in her pericranium? There it is, now--you do not! She
is thinking we admire...

Page 68

...as he was
inditing the 'aulos.'"

"Giving the lambda a fillip with my finger, I turned it...

Page 69

...in his pocket,
was seized with a violent fit of sneezing.

He continued.

"There was the soul of...

Page 70

...immediately (and a pickled spirit is not good),
they will--smell--you understand, eh? Putrefaction is always to...

Page 71

...Monsieur Bon-Bon?"

"Yes, sir--hiccup!--my soul is-"

"What, sir?"

"No shadow, damme!"

"Did you mean to say-"

"Yes, sir, my soul...

Page 72

...soon as you
receive this. Come and help us to rejoice. At last, by long...

Page 73

...of the sycamore (_platanus_), but, upon cutting into it, we
found it to be pasteboard, or,...

Page 74

...of opinion, from the redness of the epidermis, that the
embalmment had been effected altogether by...

Page 75

...nervous. As for the rest
of the company, they really made no attempt at concealing the...

Page 76

...tongue--you, whom I have always been
led to regard as the firm friend of the mummies--I...

Page 77

...figure turned peevishly
to Mr. Gliddon, and, in a peremptory tone, demanded in general terms
what we...

Page 78

...of black plaster to the tip of his nose.

It was now observed that the Count...

Page 79

...you say, dead," replied the Count, "it is more than
probable that dead, I should still...

Page 80

...have been with others) the
symbols, or media, through which we offered worship to the Creator...

Page 81

...the epoch at which he had originally
lived. Now this process of re-scription and personal rectification,
pursued...

Page 82

...human life in your time, together with
the occasional practice of passing it, as you have...

Page 83

...minutely, the proportions of the fabric to which he
referred. He explained that the portico alone...

Page 84

...had been
recently discovered by the engineers employed to bore for water in the
Great Oasis.

I then...

Page 85

...Count, at this, glanced downward to the straps of his pantaloons,
and then taking hold of...

Page 86

...soul. The value of the poem is in the ratio
of this elevating excitement. But all...

Page 87

...which has so continuously elicited admiration from these
saturnine pamphlets! A mountain, to be sure, by...

Page 88

... And a spirit in my feet
Has led...

Page 89

...looked kind on her,
And called her...

Page 90

...that
the ultimate object of all Poetry is Truth. Every poem, it is said,
should inculcate a...

Page 91

...the Beautiful, while the Moral
Sense is regardful of Duty. Of this latter, while Conscience teaches
the...

Page 92

...in Sculpture, in Architecture, in the Dance--very especially
in Music--and very peculiarly, and with a wide...

Page 93

...the precepts of Duty, or even the lessons of
Truth, may not be introduced into a...

Page 94

... Or tears from the eyelids start;

Who through long...

Page 95

..."easy" or "natural" than a Cockney exquisite, or than the
sleeping Beauty in the waxworks.

Among the...

Page 96

... Whose part in all the pomp that fills
The circuit...

Page 97

...may see the burden'd bee
Forth issue...

Page 98

...read you. These will necessarily speak for themselves.
Boccalini, in his "Advertisements from Parnassus," tells us...

Page 99

... And shield thee, and save thee,--or perish there too!

It has been...

Page 100

...Were there no bonny dames at home
...

Page 101

...importunate
Gone to her death!

Take her...

Page 102

...poor lips of hers
Oozing so clammily,
...

Page 103

...her Saviour!

The vigor of this poem is no less remarkable than its pathos. The
versification although...

Page 104

... Though woman, thou didst not forsake,
Though loved, thou forborest...

Page 105

...excitement which he induces is at
_all _times the most intense--but because it is at all...

Page 106

...Love, on the contrary--Love--the true, the divine
Eros--the Uranian as distinguished from the Diona an Venus--is
unquestionably...

Page 107

...with the soul
of the old cavalier:--

Then mounte! then mounte, brave...

Page 108

...sense wherein
Wordsworth and Coleridge are so. With the two former ethics were the
end-with the two...

Page 109

...the sacred name of
poetry, a series, such as this, of elaborate and threadbare compliments,
stitched, apparently,...

Page 110

...skipping grace
It oft would challenge me the race,
...

Page 111

...of lilies and roses which the fawn devoured as it lay upon
them, and could scarcely...

Page 112

... ...

Page 113

... ...

Page 114

...or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door--
...

Page 115

...a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
Then, upon the velvet...

Page 116

...raven, "Nevermore."

"Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!" I shrieked, upstarting--
...

Page 117

... ...

Page 118

...Oh, from out the sounding cells,
What a gush of euphony...

Page 119

...speak,
...

Page 120

... How the...

Page 121

... Is a groan.
...

Page 122

... And he dances, and he yells;
...

Page 123

...they were ashen and sober;
The leaves...

Page 124

... And star-dials pointed to morn--
...

Page 125

...us on, by this tremulous light!
Let...

Page 126

... Well I know, now, this dim lake of Auber--
...

Page 127

...in mind this garden was enchanted!)

The pearly lustre of the...

Page 128

...of day
I see them still--two sweetly scintillant
...

Page 129

...many far wiser than we--
And neither the angels in Heaven...

Page 130

... Like the knight Pinto--Mendez Ferdinando--
...

Page 131

...but you
Are mother to the one I loved so dearly,
...

Page 132

...terrible
Torture of thirst
...

Page 133

...She tenderly kissed me,
She fondly caressed,
...

Page 134

... And thus thy memory is to me
...

Page 135

... Ride, boldly ride,'
...

Page 136

...me sigh for sigh,
...

Page 137

...all,
For the resurrection of deep-buried faith
...

Page 138

...of dreams,
Gazing, entranced, adown the gorgeous vista,
...

Page 139

...their bed;
For no ripples curl, alas!
...

Page 140

... The bodiless airs, a wizard rout,
Flit through...

Page 141

...dead who groaned within.

1845.




BRIDAL BALLAD.

THE ring is on my...

Page 142

...Review," the following
remarkable poem by Edgar Poe. In our opinion, it is the most effective
single...

Page 143

... ...

Page 144

...planetary souls?"

4. "To Helen!" (Mrs. S. Helen Whitman) was not published until November,
1848, although written...

Page 145

...Slightly revised,
the poem reappeared in Burton's "Gentleman's Magazine" for August, 1839,
as "To--."

12. Although "Eldorado" was...

Page 146

..."To friends above, from fiends below, the indignant ghost is riven--
...

Page 147

... (Thirst for the springs of lore that in thee lie,)
...

Page 148

... "Not all the magic of our high renown--
...

Page 149

... In voices of surpassing beauty,
...

Page 150

... It shall not be forgot!
...

Page 151

...not!
No power hath he of evil...

Page 152

...lily,--
By the mountains--near the river
...

Page 153

... Where an Eidolon, named NIGHT,
...

Page 154

... ROME.--A Hall in a Palace Alessandra...

Page 155

... Aless. Heard I aright?
I speak to him--he speaks of...

Page 156

...well--nor learned nor mirthful he.
He is a dreamer and a man shut out
...

Page 157

...have years too many"--Ah luckless lady!
Jacinta! (still no answer)

...

Page 158

...is only paste,
For he 's sure the Count Castiglione never
Would have...

Page 159

...confidence--his vows--my ruin--think--think
Of my unspeakable misery!--begone!
Yet stay! yet stay!--what was it...

Page 160

...beset thee,
And live, for now thou diest!

...

Page 161

... Pol. Yet now as Fate
Approaches, and the Hours are breathing...

Page 162

... Say nay--say nay!"

Bal. ...

Page 163

... ...

Page 164

...love,
Knowing what I know, and seeing what I have seen.
Thou askest...

Page 165

...the blest,
And still-

Lal. Why dost thou...

Page 166

...more, and Eros be all.
And life shall then be mine, for I will...

Page 167

...the Powers
Of Darkness and the Tomb, O pity me!
O pity me!...

Page 168

...prythee, leave me--hither doth come a person
With whom affairs of a most private...

Page 169

...thus?--now this is well;
Didst say thou darest not? Ha!

...

Page 170

...villain,--I'll taunt thee,
Dost hear? with cowardice--thou wilt not fight me?
Thou liest!...

Page 171

... Duke. The Earl of Leicester! Yes!--is it he you mean?
...

Page 172

...Duke. Hal ha! Most welcome
To Rome and to our palace, Earl Politian!
...

Page 173

...they may have some chance of being seen by posterity.

"It has been said that a...

Page 174

...recommendation.

"I mentioned just now a vulgar error as regards criticism. I think the
notion that no...

Page 175

...end of instruction
should be pleasure: yet we see the above-mentioned opinion implies
precisely the reverse.

"To proceed:...

Page 176

...star without a ray-while he who
surveys it less inquisitively is conscious of all for which...

Page 177

...has _selected _for his contempt. We shall see
what better he, in his own person, has...

Page 178

...conceptions by
the barrier he has erected against those of others. It is lamentable to
think that...

Page 179

... Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering
...

Page 180

... Near four bright suns--a temporary rest--
...

Page 181

...glittering thro' the light--
A wreath...

Page 182

...fled,
Heaving her white breast to...

Page 183

...floats for ever
With Indian Cupid down the holy river--
...

Page 184

...**** And golden vials full of odors which are the prayers of the saints.
...

Page 185

...spite of many testimonies to the contrary,
could never have been...

Page 186

..."the music of the sphere."
Ours...

Page 187

... Divulge the secrets of thy embassy
...

Page 188

... Of rosy head, that towering far away
...

Page 189

...that greyish green
That Nature loves...

Page 190

...usurped by the 'Asphaltites.'

*That stole...

Page 191

... Fair flowers, bright waterfalls and angel...

Page 192

...with dew
The breath of...

Page 193

...toss?
Or, capriciously still,
...

Page 194

...Are the music of things--
...

Page 195

...lines before, has an appearance of affectation. It is,
however, imitated...

Page 196

...know
That Truth is Falsehood--or that...

Page 197

...grace imparts
To those who hear...

Page 198

... Wept for thee in Helicon.--_Milton._

...

Page 199

...as a chart unto my view--
...

Page 200

... A red Daedalion on the timid Earth.

...

Page 201

... I will not madly deem that power
...

Page 202

...drew life:
The mists of the Taglay...

Page 203

...innate nature--be it so:
But, father, there...

Page 204

... For 'mid that sunshine, and those smiles,
When, from our...

Page 205

... Of beauty which did while...

Page 206

...all beside
Of glory which the world hath known
...

Page 207

... A portrait taken after death.
And boyhood is a...

Page 208

... How was it that Ambition crept,
...

Page 209

...Heaven
Uneasily, from morn till even,
Over...

Page 210

... Which we worship in a star.

Therefore,...

Page 211

... ...

Page 212

... (Whatever it might be)
Was all on Earth my aching...

Page 213

... As a burning and a fever
Which would cling...

Page 214

... Far down within some shadowy lake,
To me a...

Page 215

... And buries them up quite
In a labyrinth of light--
...

Page 216

... To his lone imagining--
Whose solitary soul...

Page 217

... Be still my spirit!

IV

...

Page 218

... And to Athens deliverance gave.

...

Page 219

...& _only_ once & the wild hour
From my rememberance shall...

Page 220

... II

...

Page 221

... Wearing its own deep feeling as a...

Page 222

... VI.

But she is gone above,
...

Page 223

...in Youth" little comment is needed. This
section includes the pieces printed for first volume of...

Page 224

...being indented, presents a more pleasing appearance, to the eye at
least.

32. "To Helen" first appeared...

Page 225

... But dreams--of those who dream as I,
...

Page 226

... Thy lowly cottage door
...

Page 227

... I hear thy gentlest tone,
And Silence cometh...

Page 228

... Like the light of stars serene;
Like the...

Page 229

... That my youth had never known;
...

Page 230

...now know,
And strange, sweet dreams,
Like...

Page 231

...any person bearing the name of "A. M. Ide," it
is not impossible that the poems...