The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 3

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE

IN FIVE VOLUMES

VOLUME 3

The Raven Edition


CONTENTS:

...

Page 1

...I had seen
and undergone, and trust to the shrewdness and common-sense of the
public--insisting, with great...

Page 2

...was fortunate in every thing, and had
speculated very successfully in stocks of the Edgarton New...

Page 3

...without saying
a word on his favorite topic. It might have been half an hour from...

Page 4

...think proper.” Turning my eyes upon him, I perceived at once
that, in spite of his...

Page 5

...is hardly possible to conceive the extremity of my terror. The fumes
of the wine lately...

Page 6

...I come to this resolution, when, suddenly, a loud and long
scream or yell, as if...

Page 7

...drown and be dammed”
or some language to that effect. Henderson, the first mate, now...

Page 8

...was finally
disengaged from my perilous situation and taken on board--for the body
proved to be my...

Page 9

...means of preserving his life. The
Ariel was slightly put together, and in going down her...

Page 10

...flannels bathed in hot oil--a proceeding
suggested by Augustus. The wound in my neck, although of...

Page 11

...were of shipwreck and
famine; of death or captivity among barbarian hordes; of a lifetime
dragged out...

Page 12

...the fulfilment of my
long-cherished visions of travel.

In pursuance of my scheme of deception, I was...

Page 13

...had brought with him, so that my person
might not be easily recognized. Just as we...

Page 14

...way
into his own stateroom, which was on the starboard side of the brig, and
next to...

Page 15

...direction around was wedged as closely as
possible, even up to the ceiling, a complete chaos...

Page 16

...opening. During the whole period I saw nothing of Augustus;
but this occasioned me little uneasiness,...

Page 17

...I remembered all. Striking a light, I
looked at the watch; but it was run down,...

Page 18

...head winds, and were still in the near vicinity of
Nantucket. This notion, however, I was...

Page 19

...upon my bosom--his hot breath was in my ear--and his
white and ghastly fangs were gleaming...

Page 20

...him, when a puppy, from the clutches of a malignant little
villain in Nantucket who was...

Page 21

...slow degrees,
dreading every moment that I should swoon amid the narrow and intricate
windings of the...

Page 22

...large one was loose. With my
pocket-knife, which, luckily, I had with me, I succeeded, after...

Page 23

...and succeeded, after innumerable
difficulties, in getting back. As I sank, utterly exhausted, upon the
mattress, Tiger...

Page 24

...the missing
articles; never, surely, was there a more tantalizing state of anxiety
and suspense. At length,...

Page 25

...mind.
In vain I revolved in my brain a multitude of absurd expedients for
procuring light--such expedients...

Page 26

...the
egregious oversight I had committed flashed suddenly upon my perception.
The blunder itself would have been...

Page 27

...side which first presented itself.
Nothing, however, was perceptible, and I turned the paper, adjusting it
on...

Page 28

...of these two purposes in the last
emergency, had given me courage (which I should not...

Page 29

...his
eyeballs flashing fiercely through the gloom. I spoke to him, when he
replied with a low...

Page 30

...and before he could extricate himself, I had
got through the door and closed it effectually...

Page 31

...I now screamed
at the top of my voice, “Augustus! oh, Augustus!” “Hush! for God’s sake
be...

Page 32

...immediate want, or that I would hesitate,
in such case, to make myself heard at the...

Page 33

...was arrested by an unusual bustle, the sound of
which proceeded apparently from the cabin. He...

Page 34

...their opponents could get up.
These six, finding themselves so greatly outnumbered and without arms,
submitted after...

Page 35

...stature,
not more than four feet eight inches high, but his limbs were of
Herculean mould. His...

Page 36

...most
improbable of my statements.

After much indecision and two or three violent quarrels, it was
determined at...

Page 37

...of the cabin companion-way. Dirk Peters treated him
with some degree of kindness, and on one...

Page 38

...never hoping to leave the berth alive.
He now came to the resolution of acquainting the...

Page 39

...the mate’s gang. It appeared afterward that he had
crawled into a hole beneath a whale-boat,...

Page 40

...the next night. With this design, he proceeded to
loosen the hatch, so that he might...

Page 41

...to the forecastle,
where he found no reason to believe that any of the crew had...

Page 42

...the voluptuous beauty of the women. As yet, nothing had been
absolutely determined upon; but the...

Page 43

...pushed on for some time in a most pitiable state of
anxiety, until, at length, he...

Page 44

...escapes
from death, together with the frail and equivocal tenure by which he
still existed--circumstances all so...

Page 45

...of his breathing upon applying our ears closely
to the box. I was convinced that he...

Page 46

...the stowage is accomplished by means of a
screw. Thus, in a load of tobacco or...

Page 47

...a partial cargo of any kind is taken on board, the whole, after
being first stowed...

Page 48

...of Madeira there came on a strong gale from
the N. N. E. which forced him...

Page 49

...bottom of the jacket had been carefully fastened to the
bulkhead, so that the hole might...

Page 50

...rejoice that I had persisted in bringing him with me from
the box. This day was...

Page 51

...an adventure, since nothing better could be done, and that any
thing was preferable to a...

Page 52

...of this evening the leak gained upon the vessel; and little could
be done to remedy...

Page 53

...took an opportunity of quarrelling
with Peters, and hinted that he would let the mate know...

Page 54

...in our attempt, we might liberate one, or perhaps two of the
men, to aid us...

Page 55

...to let
the wind take them aback, when she becomes stationary. But we are now
speaking of...

Page 56

...no effect upon the vessel when
lying-to. Indeed, the helm had far better be left loose...

Page 57

...with other points of his singular character. But whether or not
he had any better grounds...

Page 58

...the vessel at every plunge forward. It was
indispensable, too, that we should be quick in...

Page 59

...placing billets of wood on the upper
step so as to interfere with the shutting. We...

Page 60

...mate tell one of the men to “go forward, have an eye upon
them, for he...

Page 61

...mate was evidently much agitated, and presently, when some one
mentioned the terrific appearance of Rogers’...

Page 62

...the exception of Allen, the watch; and his gigantic stature
(he was six feet six inches...

Page 63

...at a most critical
moment for Augustus, and throwing himself upon Jones, pinned him to the
floor...

Page 64

...sprung. To make room for more stowage in the afterhold, the
heel of this mast had...

Page 65

...retaining its place to larboard, we lay so much along that it was
useless to think...

Page 66

...entirely through it, being clinched on the
inside, were drawn every one of them completely out...

Page 67

...keep alive hope, and render consolation and
encouragement to such of us as stood most in...

Page 68

...part of the evening before,
Augustus spoke, asking Peters, who lay closest to him, if he...

Page 69

...of Tiger.

When I at length completely came to my senses, I found that the wind
blew...

Page 70

...from Peters. It had cut a deep gash through the waistband of his
woollen pantaloons, and...

Page 71

...now those of hunger and thirst, and when we
looked forward to the means of relief...

Page 72

...hardly expect to find much, if any, provision in the cabin
itself, it was necessary that...

Page 73

...the least difficulty in wrenching it off.
Having fastened this securely to one of his ankles,...

Page 74

...and continued for many minutes weeping like a
child.

The vessel in sight was a large hermaphrodite...

Page 75

...more steadily than before, and--I
cannot speak calmly of this event--our hearts leaped up wildly within
us,...

Page 76

...cathead. On his back, from which a portion of the shirt
had been torn, leaving it...

Page 77

...more than the half of her hull, the proposition was seriously
entertained of attempting to overtake...

Page 78

...possible
that he might be able to force it open, provided he could get at it
in...

Page 79

...in them a species
of delirium, which, perhaps, I had been prevented from feeling by the
immersion...

Page 80

...some little alleviation of my
suffering was obtained by chewing small pieces of it and spitting
them...

Page 81

...empty, and a
blanket, but nothing which could serve us for food. I continued my
efforts, after...

Page 82

...opinion of
their own condition as I did of mine, and that I may have
unwittingly been...

Page 83

...the deck, clapping
my hands, shouting, and other similar acts, until I was suddenly called
to my...

Page 84

...other two.

He heard all I said without attempting to controvert any of my
arguments, and I...

Page 85

...saved from his fate, however, by the interference of
Peters, who now approached and separated us,...

Page 86

...endured at any period of this
fearful drama was while I occupied myself in the arrangement...

Page 87

...all my strength, and passed the lots to Augustus. He also
drew immediately, and he also...

Page 88

...with occasional fogs and light
breezes, most usually from N. to W.

On the twenty-second, as we...

Page 89

...great joy, proved to be full of olives. Having
shared these among us, and devoured them...

Page 90

...of a serpent. They can exist without
food for an almost incredible length of time, instances...

Page 91

...the weather having been dry and
pleasant, the bedding we had obtained from the cabin, as...

Page 92

...instant by the sea, and in momentary dread of being washed
off. Fortunately, the weather was...

Page 93

...from the
northward and westward. The sun coming out hotly in the afternoon,
we occupied ourselves in...

Page 94

...to about four
ounces of the meat per day; the whole would thus last us thirteen...

Page 95

...as Peters
attempted to lift it, an entire leg came off in his grasp. As the...

Page 96

...prospect of relief, and the brig lying still more and more
along, so that now we...

Page 97

...knew to be
in my vicinity. In order to deter these, if possible, from approaching
me, I...

Page 98

...barnacles, which proved
to be excellent and highly nutritious food. Thus, in two important
respects, the accident...

Page 99

...make every signal in our power, by flaring the shirts in
the air, leaping as high...

Page 100

...and efficient--not less, for such a vessel as I have described,
than fifty or sixty able-bodied...

Page 101

...had passed rather as a frightful dream from which we had been
happily awakened, than as...

Page 102

...the bright spot for which we
had been on the look-out made its appearance in the...

Page 103

...acrid taste.

The face of the country is hilly, although none of the hills can be
called...

Page 104

...here to be found, among which
may be mentioned sea-hens, blue peterels, teal, ducks, Port Egmont...

Page 105

...now begin to clear
it of every species of rubbish, picking up stone by stone, and...

Page 106

...fro in the narrow alleys, and some
marching with the military strut so peculiar to them,...

Page 107

...also on
our left, then, steering more to the northward, made, in fifteen days,
the islands of...

Page 108

...also plenty in their vicinity.
Owing to the ease with which these various animals were here...

Page 109

...his little community had multiplied, there being
fifty-six persons upon Tristan, besides a smaller settlement of...

Page 110

...while some have sailed through every inch of sea where they are
supposed to lie without...

Page 111

...we found
ourselves about the station indicated by Glass, and cruised for three
days in that neighborhood...

Page 112

...were encountered, and shortly afterward the clouds
to the southward were observed to be of a...

Page 113

...farther to the south than any previous navigator,
and this, too, without encountering extraordinary difficulties. He
states...

Page 114

...and more than five hundred feet above the surface of the
water.”

Being nearly destitute of fuel...

Page 115

...by the society.

These are the principal attempts which have been made at penetrating to
a high...

Page 116

...longitude 42 degrees 10’ W, we were again brought to a stand by an
immense expanse...

Page 117

...above the other. We stood to the westward until the
fourteenth, in the hope of finding...

Page 118

...us from
destruction. Leaping upon the back of the huge beast, he plunged the
blade of a...

Page 119

...now advanced to the southward more than eight degrees farther
than any previous navigators, and the...

Page 120

...little impression had been made upon the
mind of Captain Guy. He was exceedingly sensitive to...

Page 121

...feet long and five
broad, there were a hundred and ten savages in all. They were...

Page 122

...had never before seen any of the white
race--from whose complexion, indeed, they appeared to recoil....

Page 123

...time, Too-wit being suffered to remain during the entire period.
We saw no disposition to thievery...

Page 124

...fathoms of water, black sandy
bottom. At the head of this bay there were three fine...

Page 125

...cases where little declivity was found, it bore
resemblance, as regards consistency, to a thick infusion...

Page 126

...the name of the village,
or perhaps the generic name for villages.

The dwellings were of the...

Page 127

...variety of
tame fowls running about, and these seemed to constitute the chief food
of the natives....

Page 128

...These appeared to have great
influence among the rest, and were always addressed by the title...

Page 129

...and he
immediately ordered dinner. This was handed into the tent over the
heads of the attendants,...

Page 130

...saw nothing in the
demeanour of the natives calculated to create suspicion, with the single
exception of...

Page 131

...project to the chief he seemed very willing to enter into an
agreement. A bargain was...

Page 132

...eight inches
thick. They crawl up into shallow water at particular seasons of the
year, probably for...

Page 133

...and water, and within a
convenient distance of the principal reefs on which the _biche de...

Page 134

...apeak,
about a mile from the shore, and no canoe could approach her in any
direction without...

Page 135

...trusting foolishly to the force of
our party, the unarmed condition of Too-wit and his men,...

Page 136

...calling to me for aid in the
name of God. I scrambled one or two paces...

Page 137

...the fissure,
where it made a turn to the left. A few struggles more, and we...

Page 138

...of late formation, and we concluded
that the concussion, whatever it was, which had so unexpectedly
overwhelmed...

Page 139

...of
perhaps three hundred feet, and ranging at about ten feet back from the
edge of the...

Page 140

...How we longed at that moment to be with them!
either to aid in effecting their...

Page 141

...it, and as if by magic, the Jane saw herself surrounded by an
immense multitude of...

Page 142

...a hundred
and fifty, the most of them having succeeded in scrambling up the chains
and over...

Page 143

...that, at all events, we had thus obtained a supply of food
enough to last us...

Page 144

...vicinity of the schooner, than ten thousand natives,
besides the shoals of them who, laden with...

Page 145

...schooner had picked
up at sea on the eighteenth of January. Captain Guy had had the...

Page 146

...hilltop) our progress was
entirely arrested by a branch of the gorge in which our companions...

Page 147

...Here, too, we were disappointed, although we found and
brought up with us a musket.

On the...

Page 148

...of the gulf was covered to the depth of three or four inches with
a powder...

Page 149

...him of his error, finally, by directing his attention to the
floor of the fissure, where,...

Page 150

...hole in the soapstone (as far in as eight or ten inches),
sloping away the rock...

Page 151

...the pegs and soapstone holes which were my only
support. It was in vain I endeavored...

Page 152

...been precipitated into the abyss; as
it was, he contrived to let me down gently, so...

Page 153

...of any person I have ever known. Seizing a club from one
of the savages who...

Page 154

...and, forcing our captive on board, pushed out
to sea with all the strength we could...

Page 155

...hands. They made a mad attempt at
following us in the fractured canoe, but, finding it...

Page 156

...our
possession would admit. The body of the boat was of no better material
than bark--the bark...

Page 157

...and obtained from him not only food
but a copious supply of water, we continued on...

Page 158

...of the surface; these, we at length
noticed, were always preceded by wild flickerings in the...

Page 159

...I forbore. The heat of the water still
increased, and the hand could no longer be...

Page 160

...the papers, if
ultimately found, will be given to the public.

No means have been left untried...

Page 161

...5, when conjoined with
one another in the precise order which the chasms themselves presented,
and when...

Page 162

...point,
and her fate, in many respects, so remarkably similar to our own, that
I cannot forbear...

Page 163

...that I cannot, in the first portion of
what is here written, pretend to strict accuracy...

Page 164

...the most passionate devotion?
I but indistinctly recall the fact itself--what wonder that I have
utterly forgotten...

Page 165

...brilliancy almost startling, every ray of
the holy light which fell upon them in her serene...

Page 166

...the full knowledge of their expression--felt it
approaching--yet not quite be mine--and so at length entirely...

Page 167

...fierce
energy (rendered doubly effective by contrast with her manner of
utterance) of the wild words which...

Page 168

...had been much in
her stern nature to impress me with the belief that, to her,...

Page 169

... The music of the spheres.

...

Page 170

...mysteries of the will with its
vigor? Man doth not yield him to the angels, nor...

Page 171

...which is not now visibly before me. Where were the
souls of the haughty family of...

Page 172

...figures partook of the
true character of the arabesque only when regarded from a single point
of...

Page 173

...threw her upon a bed of suffering; and from
this attack her frame, at all times...

Page 174

...out a gobletful,
which I held to the lips of the fainting lady. She had now...

Page 175

...bed of death. I listened in an agony of superstitious
terror--but there was no repetition of...

Page 176

...myself to the task which duty thus once more had
pointed out. There was now a...

Page 177

...one bewildered in
a dream, the thing that was enshrouded advanced boldly and palpably into
the middle...

Page 178

...became her pupil. I soon, however, found that, perhaps
on account of her Presburg education, she...

Page 179

...of that identity which at death
is or is not lost for ever, was to me,...

Page 180

...But within me is a pledge of that affection--ah,
how little!--which thou didst feel for me,...

Page 181

...concerned the beloved.

And as years rolled away, and I gazed day after day upon her...

Page 182

...holy man
the syllables--Morella? What more than fiend convulsed the features of
my child, and overspread them...

Page 183

...cat. The pupils, too, upon any accession or diminution of
light, underwent contraction or dilation, just...

Page 184

...however, that this rapport extended beyond the
limits of the simple sleep-producing power, but this power...

Page 185

...absolutely virgin. I could not
help believing that the green sods and the gray rocks upon...

Page 186

...hand
an instrument composed of an assemblage of steel rings, and shook them
vigorously as he ran....

Page 187

...inhabitants. The houses were wildly picturesque.
On every hand was a wilderness of balconies, of verandas,...

Page 188

...of
profound astonishment “I arose, as you say, and descended into the city.
On my way I...

Page 189

...me. I struggled--I gasped--I died. “You will hardly
persist now,” said I smiling, “that the whole...

Page 190

...He
nearly fainted as he gazed. And yet it was but a miniature portrait--a
miraculously accurate one,...

Page 191

...cold and fever were contracted, attended with
great determination of blood to the head. To relieve...

Page 192

...legislatively
adopted this surname within the last year in order to receive a large
inheritance left me...

Page 193

...I will content myself with saying,
in addition, that my temperament is sanguine, rash, ardent,
enthusiastic--and that...

Page 194

...upon one of which sparkled a diamond ring, which I
at once saw was of extraordinary...

Page 195

...accosted her at all hazards; but,
fortunately, she was attended by two companions--a gentleman, and a
strikingly...

Page 196

...enthusiastic and
romantic temperment, with an interest tenfold.

While I thus feasted my eyes, I perceived, at...

Page 197

...of so fascinating a woman, had upon my
excitable mind.

Having thus scrutinized me for perhaps a...

Page 198

...for an instant. What other
construction could I possibly put upon such conduct, on the part...

Page 199

...who
claimed her personal acquaintance. These few, being still comparatively
strangers, could not, or would not, take...

Page 200

...before
Talbot came back--and might she not be thus lost to me forever? The
thought was too...

Page 201

...relief? Still, however, he came not. I wrote. He replied. He was
detained by urgent business--but...

Page 202

...I had most imprudently made it known among my
friends, she observed, that I desired her...

Page 203

...was not
aware that the years of my Eugenie extended very considerably beyond
that sum.

About all this...

Page 204

...rooms of the suite,
and in which the company chiefly assembled, remained, during the whole
evening, in...

Page 205

...these miracles of vocal execution, she
resumed her seat by my side; when I expressed to...

Page 206

...yield to your
entreaties--and, I may add, to the pleadings of my own bosom--would I
not be...

Page 207

...see him at once, and procure a carriage. The soiree would
scarcely break up before two;...

Page 208

...are indissolubly
one--since I have yielded to your passionate entreaties, and performed
my portion of our agreement--I...

Page 209

...to say,
Simpson--spoke the English language but very little better than she
wrote it, and for this...

Page 210

...von ver stupide, von ver, ver stupide sonn, so I hear,
dough I not yet av...

Page 211

...surveying me through her eye-glass, she was struck
with a certain family resemblance to herself. Thus...

Page 212

...and which so confirmed
my impression of the youth of my mistress, were executed by Madame
Stephanie...

Page 213

...think, the most interesting, if
not the most conspicuous.

The one who appeared to be the elder,...

Page 214

...over the doorway by means of
that very mineral whose presence they purported to deny. Not...

Page 215

...there were very few of the terror-stricken people who attributed
these doings to the agency of...

Page 216

...of the pestilence. Their
way at every step or plunge grew more noisome and more horrible--the
paths...

Page 217

...around
his form after the fashion of a Spanish cloak.--His head was stuck full
of sable hearse-plumes,...

Page 218

...a somewhat equivocal expression.

Over against her, and upon the left of the dropsical lady, was...

Page 219

...human skeleton, by means of a
rope tied round one of the legs and fastened to...

Page 220

...shipmate, Will Wimble the
undertaker!”

At this unpardonable piece of ill-breeding, all the original company
half started to...

Page 221

...our duty to mulct thee and thy
companion in each a gallon of Black Strap--having imbibed...

Page 222

...of the shroud gasped like a
dying fish; and he of the coffin looked stiff and...

Page 223

...tub
of punch into the fire-place--and the ladies into hysterics. Piles of
death-furniture floundered about. Jugs, pitchers,...

Page 224

...leave it at random--some time
within a year or so, for example?--must I say precisely?”

“If you...

Page 225

...humanities” had, also, much increased of late, by
an accidental bias in favor of what he...

Page 226

...pounds from his own pocket (Kate’s plum was her own) if he
could have invented any...

Page 227

...“Yes, yes, yes--I remember it very well--very queer indeed! Both
of you gone just one year....

Page 228

...that is at the rate of one
thousand miles per hour. Now, suppose that I sail...