The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 2

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE

VOLUME II

The Raven Edition

[Redactor's Note--Some endnotes are by Poe and...

Page 1

...as of the contemptible about the man, and we had not seen
him for several years....

Page 2

...a doubt; he was seen to take it. It is known, also,
that it still remains...

Page 3

...elbow. The minister
decamped; leaving his own letter--one of no importance--upon the table."

"Here, then," said Dupin...

Page 4

...his own premises?"

"This is barely possible," said Dupin. "The present peculiar condition
of affairs at court,...

Page 5

...our case, we were obliged to
proceed without noise."

"But you could not have removed--you could not...

Page 6

...the
microscope."

"And the paper on the walls?"

"Yes."

"You looked into the cellars?"

"We did."

"Then," I said, "you have...

Page 7

...suppose,' said the miser, 'that his symptoms are such and
such; now, doctor, what would you...

Page 8

...too deep or too shallow, for
the matter in hand; and many a schoolboy is a...

Page 9

...Bougive, to Machiavelli, and to Campanella."

"And the identification," I said, "of the reasoner's intellect with...

Page 10

...never been known to fail. You will now understand what I
meant in suggesting that, had...

Page 11

...what is called pure
algebra, are abstract or general truths. And this error is so egregious
that...

Page 12

...investigations of his premises. His
frequent absences from home at night, which were hailed by the...

Page 13

...playing requires another to find a given word--the name of
town, river, state or empire--any word,...

Page 14

...of
the mantel-piece. In this rack, which had three or four compartments,
were five or six visiting...

Page 15

...It was clear to me that the letter
had been turned, as a glove, inside out,...

Page 16

...easy to get up than to come down. In the present instance I have
no sympathy--at...

Page 17

...a
certain monarch having good cause to be jealous of his queen, not only
puts her to...

Page 18

...an undertone, of
course) to her sister. When the day broke, it so happened that this
history...

Page 19

...French proverb, "est l'ennemi du bien," and,
in mentioning that Scheherazade had inherited the seven baskets...

Page 20

...out into the ocean in the hope of perceiving a ship,
but during several hours we...

Page 21

...nor wings like
the seashell which is blown along in the manner of a vessel; nor...

Page 22

...turned to the porter, who was near swooning through affright, and
demanded of him his opinion...

Page 23

...thousand pardons, I had forgotten that your majesty is not
conversant with the dialect of the...

Page 24

...forty miles within the
bowels of the earth, and that contained a greater number of far...

Page 25

...line the sides of them with rocks, so disposed one upon the other
that they fall...

Page 26

...on your
seraglio, oh, most Munificent of Caliphs. This terrible fowl had no head
that we could...

Page 27

...of the horse, (to whom, in fact, she was nearly
related,) was boiling water; and like...

Page 28

...legs, fight, or even get up and dance at his will. (*28) Another
had cultivated his...

Page 29

...by since it was possible to distinguish a woman from
a dromedary-'"

"Stop!" said the king--"I can't...

Page 30

...black shining rock, some fifteen or sixteen hundred feet
from the world of crags beneath us....

Page 31

...in the
remote offing lay to under a double-reefed trysail, and constantly
plunged her whole hull out...

Page 32

...of the whirl was
represented by a broad belt of gleaming spray; but no particle of...

Page 33

...only at the turn of the ebb and flood,
and in calm weather, and last but...

Page 34

...received is that
this, as well as three smaller vortices among the Ferroe islands, "have
no other...

Page 35

...we made
it a matter of desperate speculation--the risk of life standing instead
of labor, and courage...

Page 36

...danger, and that is the
truth.

"It is now within a few days of three years since...

Page 37

...if they had been sawed
off--the mainmast taking with it my youngest brother, who had lashed
himself...

Page 38

...and watch carefully for the slack--but now we were driving right
upon the pool itself, and...

Page 39

...it as it rose--up--up--as
if into the sky. I would not have believed that any wave...

Page 40

...my own
individual life, in view of so wonderful a manifestation of God's power.
I do believe...

Page 41

...with him. I knew it could make
no difference whether either of us held on at...

Page 42

...if we had been upon a dead level; and this, I suppose, was owing to
the...

Page 43

...arose partly from memory, and partly from
present observation. I called to mind the great variety...

Page 44

...seemed
to have moved but little from their original station.

"I no longer hesitated what to do....

Page 45

...of the Stroem, and in a few minutes was
hurried down the coast into the 'grounds'...

Page 46

...me, I confess, a little
apocryphal, for several reasons; although there is nothing either
impossible or very...

Page 47

...writer's own eye, but an inspection of the pamphlet
will convince almost any thinking person of...

Page 48

...in a few days, is not a
small matter, as times go.

'The Literary World' speaks of...

Page 49

...at length arrested, but nothing decisive appearing against him, was
in the end set at liberty....

Page 50

...bottom portion. Upon attempting to draw this trunk
out from under the bed, they found that,...

Page 51

...from lead in connection
with certain other substances, in kind and in proportions, unknown.'

Speculation, of course,...

Page 52

...finally,
that his susceptibility to the impression increases with its frequency,
while, in the same proportion, the...

Page 53

...end had plainly forgotten his
beginning, like the government of Trinculo. In short, I was not...

Page 54

...would explain yourself, Mr. Vankirk.

_V._ I am willing to do so, but it requires more...

Page 55

...metal, a piece of wood, a drop of
water, the atmosphere, a gas, caloric, electricity, the...

Page 56

...of adamant
or of iron.

_V._ Your objection is answered with an ease which is nearly in...

Page 57

...it is an
absurdity.

_P._ [_Referring to my notes._] You _did_ say that "divested of
corporate investiture man...

Page 58

...the luminiferous ether.
The vibrations generate similar ones within the retina; these again
communicate similar ones to...

Page 59

...imperfection, wrong, positive
pain. Through the impediments afforded by the number, complexity, and
substantiality of the laws...

Page 60

...consider it any matter for wonder, that
the extraordinary case of M. Valdemar has excited discussion....

Page 61

...my becoming acquainted with
him, his physicians had declared him in a confirmed phthisis. It was...

Page 62

...region was merely a mass
of purulent tubercles, running one into another. Several extensive
perforations existed; and,...

Page 63

...he spoke thus, I commenced the passes which I had already found
most effectual in subduing...

Page 64

...imperceptible; the breathing was gentle
(scarcely noticeable, unless through the application of a mirror to the
lips);...

Page 65

...of
the sleep-waker. The eyes rolled themselves slowly open, the pupils
disappearing upwardly; the skin generally assumed...

Page 66

...a few minutes before. I had asked him,
it will be remembered, if he still slept....

Page 67

...resolved to make the experiment
of awakening or attempting to awaken him; and it is the...

Page 68

...to-morrow I die, and to-day
I would unburthen my soul. My immediate purpose is to place...

Page 69

...the streets.

Our friendship lasted, in this manner, for several years, during which
my general temperament and...

Page 70

...as if to my final and
irrevocable overthrow, the spirit of PERVERSENESS. Of this spirit
philosophy takes...

Page 71

...the fire--a fact which I
attributed to its having been recently spread. About this wall a
dense...

Page 72

...a white hair upon
any portion of his body; but this cat had a large, although...

Page 73

...memory of my former crime, but chiefly--let me confess it at
once--by absolute dread of the...

Page 74

...the steep stairs, and, nearly throwing me headlong,
exasperated me to madness. Uplifting an axe, and...

Page 75

...that all was right. The wall did not present
the slightest appearance of having been disturbed....

Page 76

...suspicions. I wish you all health, and a little
more courtesy. By the bye, gentlemen, this--this...

Page 77

...building, a sense of
insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the
feeling was unrelieved...

Page 78

...It
was the manner in which all this, and much more, was said--it was the
apparent _heart_...

Page 79

...upon my imagination as really to believe that
about the whole mansion and domain there hung...

Page 80

...a door and ushered
me into the presence of his master.

The room in which I found...

Page 81

...been suffered to
grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated
rather than...

Page 82

...must abandon life and reason together, in some struggle with the
grim phantasm, FEAR."

I learned, moreover,...

Page 83

...at least while
living, would be seen by me no more.

For several days ensuing, her name...

Page 84

...the earth. No outlet was observed in any
portion of its vast extent, and no torch,...

Page 85

...long ago)
And every gentle air that dallied,
...

Page 86

... ...

Page 87

...works as the Ververt et Chartreuse of Gresset; the Belphegor of
Machiavelli; the Heaven and Hell...

Page 88

...and the whole interior of a long archway
through which we reached it, were carefully sheathed...

Page 89

...I experienced the full power of such feelings. Sleep came
not near my couch--while the hours...

Page 90

...so low as to press upon the turrets of the house)
did not prevent our perceiving...

Page 91

...but, feeling the rain upon his
shoulders, and fearing the rising of the tempest, uplifted his...

Page 92

...thousand conflicting sensations,
in which wonder and extreme terror were predominant, I still retained
sufficient presence of...

Page 93

...I am!--I dared
not--I _dared_ not speak! _We have put her living in the tomb!_ Said...

Page 94

...I saw the mighty walls rushing asunder--there
was a long tumultuous shouting sound like the voice...

Page 95

...Upon
its front were characters engraven in the stone; and I walked through
the morass of water-lilies,...

Page 96

...and observed the actions of the man. And the man
trembled in the solitude;--but the night...

Page 97

...of all! And as the Demon made an end of his story, he fell
back within...

Page 98

...slide back nearly to the walls on either hand, so that
the view of the whole...

Page 99

...hour was to be stricken, there came from the
brazen lungs of the clock a sound...

Page 100

...there strikes the ebony clock which stands in
the hall of the velvet. And then, for...

Page 101

...without emotion. Even with
the utterly lost, to whom life and death are equally jests, there...

Page 102

...from the
first, through the blue chamber to the purple--through the purple to
the green--through the green...

Page 103

...thought of his immolation.

He had a weak point--this Fortunato--although in other regards he was
a man...

Page 104

...time. I had told them that I should not return until the
morning, and had given...

Page 105

...said.

The wine sparkled in his eyes and the bells jingled. My own fancy grew
warm with...

Page 106

...Fortunato, uplifting his dull torch, endeavored to
pry into the depths of the recess. Its termination...

Page 107

...the chained form, seemed to thrust me violently back. For a
brief moment I hesitated--I trembled....

Page 108

...escape our senses,
solely through want of belief--of faith;--whether it be faith in
Revelation, or faith in...

Page 109

...motive
not motivirt. Through its promptings we act without comprehensible
object; or, if this shall be understood...

Page 110

...the deep regret and
mortification of the speaker, and in defiance of all consequences) is
indulged.

We have...

Page 111

...desire it. And because our reason violently deters us
from the brink, therefore do we the...

Page 112

...brain. Of the remains of the fatal
taper I had myself carefully disposed. I had left...

Page 113

...I would have
done it, but a rough voice resounded in my ears--a rougher grasp seized
me...

Page 114

...dark valleys, and the gray rocks, and
the waters that silently smile, and the forests that...

Page 115

...meditations
among the mountains and the forests, by the rivers and the ocean, a
tinge of what...

Page 116

...The trees were lithe,
mirthful, erect--bright, slender, and graceful,--of eastern figure and
foliage, with bark smooth, glossy,...

Page 117

...the form of one of those very Fays
about whom I had been pondering made its...

Page 118

...as thou _shouldst
be_--squandering away a life of magnificent meditation in that city of
dim visions, thine...

Page 119

...only within the abyss. Upon the broad black marble
flagstones at the entrance of the palace,...

Page 120

...and rigid limbs, I floated down
among them in that funereal gondola.

All efforts proved in vain....

Page 121

...of the
stranger. What reason could there have been for the low--the singularly
low tone of those...

Page 122

...call upon him _very_ early the
next morning. Shortly after sunrise, I found myself accordingly at...

Page 123

...with my magnificence? But pardon me, my dear
sir, (here his tone of voice dropped to...

Page 124

...think you," said he,
turning abruptly as he spoke--"what think you of this Madonna della
Pieta?"

"It is...

Page 125

...in
momentary expectation of a visiter, or to sounds which must have had
existence in his imagination...

Page 126

... From Love to titled age and crime,
And an unholy...

Page 127

... "He...

Page 128

...wine, he threw himself
at full-length upon an ottoman.

A quick step was now heard upon the...

Page 129

...of charity, and seemed white and slender angels who would save
me; but then, all at...

Page 130

...some musical cadence which has
never before arrested his attention.

Amid frequent and thoughtful endeavors to remember;...

Page 131

...thoughts, then, were
confirmed. The blackness of eternal night encompassed me. I struggled
for breath. The intensity...

Page 132

...judges to doubt. The
mode and the hour were all that occupied or distracted me.

My outstretched...

Page 133

...first I proceeded with extreme
caution, for the floor, although seemingly of solid material, was
treacherous with...

Page 134

...terrors of the wells, of which my
imagination now pictured many in various positions about the...

Page 135

...intervals. The general shape of
the prison was square. What I had taken for masonry seemed...

Page 136

...more in wonder. Wearied at length with observing
its dull movement, I turned my eyes upon...

Page 137

...closely over me as to fan me
with its acrid breath. The odor of the sharp...

Page 138

...contrasting
its downward with its lateral velocity. To the right--to the left--far
and wide--with the shriek of...

Page 139

...upon my mind what I cannot better describe than as the
unformed half of that idea...

Page 140

...vain. I at
length felt that I was free. The surcingle hung in ribands from my...

Page 141

...iron! A suffocating odour pervaded the prison! A
deeper glow settled each moment in the eyes...

Page 142

...of foothold
on the firm floor of the prison. I struggled no more, but the agony...

Page 143

...suspensions, properly so called. They are only
temporary pauses in the incomprehensible mechanism. A certain period
elapses,...

Page 144

...which
led down into the dread chamber was a large fragment of the coffin,
with which, it...

Page 145

...lady's appearance that her friends would be unable to
recognize her. They were mistaken, however, for,...

Page 146

...of the crowd overhead, and endeavored to make
himself heard in turn. It was the tumult...

Page 147

...spoken, he fell
heavily to the floor.

For some moments all were paralyzed with awe--but the urgency...

Page 148

...interest profound; an interest, nevertheless, which, through
the sacred awe of the topic itself, very properly...

Page 149

...Nothing became the universe.
Total annihilation could be no more. From these latter attacks I awoke,
however,...

Page 150

...not bid thee arise?"

"And who," I demanded, "art thou?"

"I have no name in the regions...

Page 151

...customary duration, they
might be prevailed upon to regard me as irrecoverable. I even went so
far...

Page 152

...endeavor to remember. And now a
partial and evanescent success. And now the memory has so...

Page 153

...too, there came suddenly to my nostrils the strong
peculiar odor of moist earth. The conclusion...

Page 154

...in default of my
customary nightcap.

The tortures endured, however, were indubitably quite equal for the
time, to...

Page 155

...understand that in
general, from the violation of a few simple laws of humanity arises the
wretchedness...

Page 156

...hundred years before Mr. Ellison's coming of
age, there had died, in a remote province, one...

Page 157

...did, in fact, abandon the very unusual wealth which
was his own before the inheritance.

I was...

Page 158

...in
which the common understanding of the poetic sentiment has declared it
capable of expatiating. But Ellison...

Page 159

...beauty. In landscape alone is the principle of the
critic true; and, having felt its truth...

Page 160

...not
beyond the limits of its atmosphere. It is easily understood that what
might improve a closely...

Page 161

...veil inaccuracy of thought.
The phrase quoted may mean any thing, or nothing, and guides in...

Page 162

...obvious force of a feeling.
Now let us suppose this sense of the Almighty design to...

Page 163

...frequent hours in which I shall need, too, the sympathy of the poetic
in what I...

Page 164

...domestic beauty, on which grazed innumerable sheep,
their white fleeces spotting the vivid green of rolling...

Page 165

...extent when compared with the width of the gorge. It
was about two hundred yards in...

Page 166

...motionless in the middle of the lake.
While he considers what course to pursue, however, he...

Page 167

...seen to
sweep, still following the general course of the stream. Down this new
opening the eye...

Page 168

...so
confusedly, in its effort to keep in the valleys, that I no longer knew
in what...

Page 169

...was much to wonder at in the
mere excess of art manifested; all that seemed to...

Page 170

...sight, glaring
with a purplish lustre through a chasm that entered the valley from the
west. Suddenly,...

Page 171

...valley. As regards vegetation, as well as in respect to every thing
else, the scene softened...

Page 172

...the largest four feet in diameter, at twenty from the
ground. The innumerable blossoms, mingling with...

Page 173

...forty feet long, and spanned the interval between shore
and shore with a slight but very...

Page 174

...as meandering very irregularly through the
whole of its course. Its two general directions, as I...

Page 175

...building and western wing arose a very tall and rather
slender square chimney of hard Dutch...

Page 176

...formed by the main structure and
its west wing, in front, sprang a grape-vine of unexampled...

Page 177

...He not only
shut his mouth and wagged his tail, but absolutely offered me his
paw-afterward extending...

Page 178

...the furniture of the
parlor. On the floor was an ingrain carpet, of excellent texture--a
white ground,...

Page 179

...race. To the uttermost regions of the globe have not
the indignant winds bruited its unparalleled...

Page 180

...an age when
few children have abandoned their leading-strings, I was left to the
guidance of my...

Page 181

...angle of the ponderous wall frowned a more ponderous gate. It was
riveted and studded with...

Page 182

...one of the "English and
mathematical." Interspersed about the room, crossing and recrossing
in endless irregularity, were...

Page 183

...designated myself as
William Wilson,--a fictitious title not very dissimilar to the real.
My namesake alone, of...

Page 184

...own nativity.

It may seem strange that in spite of the continual anxiety occasioned me
by the...

Page 185

...praenomen. The words were venom in my
ears; and when, upon the day of my arrival,...

Page 186

...chuckle
in secret over the sting he had inflicted, and was characteristically
disregardful of the public applause...

Page 187

...which first
startled, and then deeply interested me, by bringing to mind dim visions
of my earliest...

Page 188

...I shook as if with a fit of the ague in fancying they
were not. What...

Page 189

...extravagance was at its height. Madly
flushed with cards and intoxication, I was in the act...

Page 190

...him, that a sudden accident in his family had
caused his removal from Dr. Bransby's academy...

Page 191

...this meeting should be
final and decisive) at the chambers of a fellow-commoner, (Mr. Preston,)
equally intimate...

Page 192

...play,
when some expressions at my elbow from among the company, and an
ejaculation evincing utter despair...

Page 193

...search ensued. In the
lining of my sleeve were found all the court cards essential in...

Page 194

...of mind, I took the one offered me by Preston; placed it,
unnoticed, over my own;...

Page 195

...could fail to recognise the William Wilson of my
school boy days,--the namesake, the companion, the...

Page 196

...entirely covered his face.

"Scoundrel!" I said, in a voice husky with rage, while every syllable
I...

Page 197

...had been and am; but
why will you say that I am mad? The disease had...

Page 198

...chamber, and spoke courageously to him, calling him by name in a
hearty tone, and inquiring...

Page 199

...only a mouse crossing the floor," or "It is merely a
cricket which has made a...

Page 200

...leaped into the room. He shrieked once--once only. In an instant
I dragged him to the...

Page 201

...officers were satisfied. My manner had convinced them. I was
singularly at ease. They sat, and...

Page 202

...beauty I have derived
a type of unloveliness?--from the covenant of peace, a simile of sorrow?
But...

Page 203

...* *

Berenice and I were cousins, and we grew up together in my paternal
halls. Yet...

Page 204

...for long unwearied hours, with my attention riveted to some
frivolous device on the margin, or...

Page 205

...Regni
Dei;_" St. Austin's great work, the "City of God;" and Tertullian's "_De
Carne Christi_," in which...

Page 206

...I spoke to her
of marriage.

And at length the period of our nuptials was approaching, when,...

Page 207

...I struggled in vain against its strange and
irresistible influence. In the multiplied objects of the...

Page 208

...at least no definite
comprehension. Yet its memory was replete with horror--horror more
horrible from being vague,...

Page 209

...intermingled with
thirty-two small, white and ivory-looking substances that were scattered
to and fro about the floor.




ELEONORA

...

Page 210

...the foliage of many thousands of
forest trees, and of crushing to death the glories of...

Page 211

...the serpent-like
trees, and looked down within the water of the River of Silence at our
images...

Page 212

...only to die; but
the terrors of the grave to her lay solely in a consideration...

Page 213

...within the Valley of the
Many-Colored Grass; but a second change had come upon all things....

Page 214

...the indications of the presence of Eleonora were still
given me in the silent hours of...

Page 215

...Suez, and after having travelled some ten miles up
a low barren valley, covered with sand,...

Page 216

...It was a part of the forest of
Aripao which sank, and the trees remained green...

Page 217

...tube of the corrolla in quest of honey, descends to the
bottom, and rummages about till...

Page 218

...tons was
whirled from Paddington to Didcot (53 miles) in 51 minutes.

(*21) The _Eccalobeion_

(*22) Maelzel's Automaton...

Page 219

...moderate estimate. Thus, if they had been annihilated 20, or 1000
years ago, we might still...