The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 1

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE

IN FIVE VOLUMES


The Raven Edition




VOLUME I


Contents:

...

Page 1

...scholars, one of the most original men of
genius, and one of the most industrious of...

Page 2

...might not a Poe claim!

Edgar's father, a son of General David Poe, the American revolutionary
patriot...

Page 3

...verses, which was soon
published. Its title was "Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane and Other Poems." Neither
of these...

Page 4

...not until a year later that
the bride and her widowed mother followed him thither.

Poe's devotion...

Page 5

...his pleasure because a magazine to which he was to
contribute had agreed to pay him...

Page 6

...a milk-and-water way.
Our capital city, unlike London or Paris, is not a great central heart
from...

Page 7

...mentioned, soon after
relieved him of all doubt in this regard, and he committed himself at
once...

Page 8

...a safer augury might have been drawn. They show the patient
investigator, the close student of...

Page 9

...hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me...

Page 10

...Talent
sticks fast to earth, and its most perfect works have still one foot of
clay. Genius...

Page 11

...In judging of the merit of an author, and assigning him his
niche among our household...

Page 12

...pulse of the machine,"


for such it practically is to him, with wheels and cogs and...

Page 13

...aesthetically deficient. Unerring in his
analysis of dictions, metres and plots, he seemed wanting in the...

Page 14

...can see but with the vision
of genius. Suddenly starting from a proposition, exactly and sharply
defined,...

Page 15

...being, in which the individual survives the person. While we
read the pages of the 'Fall...

Page 16

...let
us truthfully say:

Some four or five years since, when editing a daily paper in this
city,...

Page 17

...him.
We know it from hearsay, and we mention it in connection with this sad
infirmity of...

Page 18

...lines if they please you.

...

Page 19

...he has invariably seemed to us, in all we have happened
personally to know of him,...

Page 20

...to escape her
lips that could convey a doubt of him, or a complaint, or a...

Page 21

...in her hands.





THE UNPARALLELED ADVENTURES OF ONE HANS PFAALL (*1)

BY late accounts from Rotterdam, that...

Page 22

...enough to be accurately discerned. It
appeared to be--yes! it was undoubtedly a species of balloon;...

Page 23

...of the person of its occupant. This was in truth a very
droll little somebody. He...

Page 24

...detain him in Rotterdam, began
at this moment to make busy preparations for departure; and it...

Page 25

...the little square brick building, at
the head of the alley called Sauerkraut, in which I...

Page 26

...fair words, until, by some good turn of
fate, an opportunity of vengeance should be afforded...

Page 27

...that I could not distinguish a star with
nearly as much precision, when I gazed on...

Page 28

...varnish of caoutchouc; a
large and deep basket of wicker-work, made to order; and several other
articles...

Page 29

...manner with covered trains; and having let into one of the
canisters the end of about...

Page 30

...was defended,
began to grow rather heavy with the moisture; the powder also was liable
to damage....

Page 31

...however, had I attained the height of fifty yards, when,
roaring and rumbling up after me...

Page 32

...wondered what occurrence could have given rise to the swelling of
the veins, and the horrible...

Page 33

...understood that I was
therefore only forty-five degrees below the perpendicular. So far from
it, I still...

Page 34

...the question.
Looking at my watch, I found it six o'clock. I was still rapidly
ascending, and...

Page 35

...the 237,000 miles I would have to deduct the
radius of the earth, say 4,000, and...

Page 36

...in point of fact, an ascension being made to any given altitude,
the ponderable quantity of...

Page 37

...of a rare
atmosphere extending from the sun outward, beyond the orbit of Venus at
least, and...

Page 38

...would not only be itself subject
to rarefaction partially similar (in proportion to the occurrence of
which,...

Page 39

...that is to say three
miles and three-quarters, I threw out from the car a quantity...

Page 40

...I soon rose above
the difficulty, and perceived immediately, that I had obtained a great
increase in...

Page 41

...and
in a gasping manner--bleeding all the while copiously at the nose and
ears, and even slightly...

Page 42

...addition
to the number of passengers on my part altogether unexpected; but I was
pleased at the...

Page 43

...echoes
of the mighty cataract. Overhead, the sky was of a jetty black, and the
stars were...

Page 44

...along
the outside of the ropes, to the upper rim or hoop where the net-work
is attached....

Page 45

...up
very tightly on the inside by means of a kind of stationary tourniquet.

"In the sides...

Page 46

...some little risk, and before
closing the mouth of the chamber, by reaching under the car...

Page 47

...in a very few seconds. I did not
at first know what to make of this...

Page 48

...were not the
sole possessors of my brain. Horrors of a nature most stern and most
appalling...

Page 49

...hope that
either cat or kittens would ever live to tell the tale of their
misfortune.

"At six...

Page 50

...manner, and
the only real difficulty was to contrive a method of arousing myself
at the proper...

Page 51

...would fill the latter to the brim in the period
of sixty minutes. This, of course,...

Page 52

...When darkness came over the earth, I betook
myself to bed, although it was for many...

Page 53

...my great joy, at length beheld what
there could be no hesitation in supposing the northern...

Page 54

...in its general color and
appearance. The whole visible area partook in different degrees of a
tint...

Page 55

...of being
full. It now required long and excessive labor to condense within the
chamber sufficient atmospheric...

Page 56

...of that singular class
of substances occasionally picked up on the earth, and termed meteoric
stones for...

Page 57

...speed
by no means commensurate with the velocity I had at first so horribly
conceived. This consideration...

Page 58

...of the hemisphere in sight was
covered with innumerable volcanic mountains, conical in shape, and
having more...

Page 59

...occultation of Jupiter's satellites, the third
disappeared after having been about 1" or 2" of time...

Page 60

...car of my
balloon. Yet this should have been the case, and in an equal degree
as...

Page 61

...only deeply interesting in its own peculiar
character, but rendered doubly so by its intimate connection,...

Page 62

...of the moon, whom I have prevailed upon, and properly
instructed, to be my messenger to...

Page 63

...printed in
Rotterdam.

He was mistaken--undoubtedly--mistaken.

Fourthly, That Hans Pfaall himself, the drunken villain, and the three
very idle...

Page 64

...power of 42,000 times.
By this divide 240,000 (the moon's real distance), and we have five
miles...

Page 65

...even.

The description of the wings of the man-bat, on page 21, is but a
literal copy...

Page 66

...that is required, man's
ingenuity would ultimately prove equal to the task, and we might have
them...

Page 67

...that, being
ill during a sea voyage, the crew abandoned him, together with a
negro servant, on...

Page 68

...they seem to the inhabitants
of the earth. The moon, which wanted two days of being...

Page 69

...Hill, a lofty mountain at the end of Bantry Bay.

In these various _brochures _the aim...

Page 70

...of a mile. It is
separated from the main land by a scarcely perceptible creek, oozing...

Page 71

...from the Island, while the
facilities of passage and re-passage were very far behind those of
the...

Page 72

...shape."
Saying this, he seated himself at a small table, on which were a pen and
ink,...

Page 73

...distinct as they are in the original insect, and I presume that is
sufficient."

"Well, well," I...

Page 74

...for all
dat."

"Very sick, Jupiter!--why didn't you say so at once? Is he confined to
bed?"

"No, dat...

Page 75

...bite made him sick?"

"I do n't tink noffin about it--I nose it. What make him...

Page 76

...in which we were to
embark.

"What is the meaning of all this, Jup?" I inquired.

"Him syfe,...

Page 77

...view.
There were two round, black spots near one extremity of the back, and
a long one...

Page 78

...for we have no time to lose."

With a heavy heart I accompanied my friend. We...

Page 79

...have
been impossible to force our way but for the scythe; and Jupiter, by
direction of his...

Page 80

...his naked toes upon
others, Jupiter, after one or two narrow escapes from falling, at length
wriggled...

Page 81

...as mought be. Mought ventur out leetle way pon de
limb by myself, dat's true."

"By yourself!--what...

Page 82

...dat done, Massa Will; mighty easy ting for to put de bug fru de
hole--look out...

Page 83

...lunacy would readily be led away by such
suggestions--especially if chiming in with favorite preconceived
ideas--and then...

Page 84

...astonished negro opened his eyes and mouth to the fullest extent,
let fall the spades, and...

Page 85

...expectation, for the fancied
treasure, the vision of which had demented my unfortunate companion. At
a period...

Page 86

...our eyes.

I shall not pretend to describe the feelings with which I gazed.
Amazement was, of...

Page 87

...and the
greater part of the next night, in a scrutiny of its contents. There had
been...

Page 88

...into a full detail of all the
circumstances connected with it.

"You remember;" said he, "the night...

Page 89

...to remember that there had been no drawing upon
the parchment when I made my sketch...

Page 90

...on all subjects
connected with Natural History. At the same time, without being
conscious of it, I...

Page 91

...it. Then it was not
done by human agency. And nevertheless it was done.

"At this stage...

Page 92

...million
and a half of money is too serious a matter for mirth--but you are not
about...

Page 93

...me that some accident--say the
loss of a memorandum indicating its locality--had deprived him of the
means...

Page 94

...as would appear, to the crude
intellect of the sailor, absolutely insoluble without the key."

"And you...

Page 95

... # ) ...

Page 96

... -. " ...

Page 97

..._th_ can be a part. We are thus
narrowed into

t ee,

and, going through the alphabet, if...

Page 98

..." h
...

Page 99

...an object would be nearly
certain to overdo the matter. When, in the course of his...

Page 100

...a foot wide, while a niche in the cliff just above it, gave it
a rude...

Page 101

...feet, would indicate a definite
point--and beneath this point I thought it at least possible that...

Page 102

...punish you quietly, in my own
way, by a little bit of sober mystification. For this...

Page 103

...particularly allude. But ours is that which went by the name of
Antiochia Epidaphne, from its...

Page 104

...is well fortified; and in this respect is as much indebted to nature
as to art."

Very...

Page 105

...respective owners in the capacity of
valets-de-chambre. It is true, there are occasions when Nature asserts
her...

Page 106

...a Latin hymn upon the valor of the king, and are singing it as they
go:

Mille,...

Page 107

...his head, and the queer color of his face, which
has become nondescript from the quantity...

Page 108

...from a catapult he approaches the hippodrome! He leaps!--he
shrieks!--he is there! This is well; for...

Page 109

...his talent into play. He
is fond of enigmas, of conundrums, of hieroglyphics; exhibiting in his
solutions...

Page 110

...take an apparently unaccountable delight in it, while eschewing
chess as frivolous. Beyond doubt there is...

Page 111

...played, he is in full possession of the
contents of each hand, and thenceforward puts down...

Page 112

...be to me a treasure beyond price; and this feeling I
frankly confided to him. It...

Page 113

...knowledge of my own. His manner at these moments
was frigid and abstract; his eyes were...

Page 114

...ran up against you as we entered the street--it may have
been fifteen minutes ago."

I now...

Page 115

...of atomies, and thus of the theories of Epicurus;
and since, when we discussed this subject...

Page 116

...and
everything remained perfectly quiet. The party spread themselves and
hurried from room to room. Upon arriving...

Page 117

...relation to this most extraordinary and frightful affair. [The word
'affaire' has not yet, in France,...

Page 118

...crowbar. Had but little difficulty
in getting it open, on account of its being a double...

Page 119

...firm of Mignaud et Fils, Rue Deloraine.
Is the elder Mignaud. Madame L'Espanaye had some property....

Page 120

...was a four story
one, with garrets (_mansardes._) A trap-door on the roof was nailed down
very...

Page 121

...by the pressure of a knee. In the opinion
of M. Dumas, Mademoiselle L'Espanaye had been...

Page 122

...entendre la musique._ The results attained
by them are not unfrequently surprising, but, for the most...

Page 123

...an objectless curiosity, from
the opposite side of the way. It was an ordinary Parisian house,...

Page 124

...of the room; the
corpse thrust, with the head downward, up the chimney; the frightful
mutilation of...

Page 125

...the task of thrusting her daughter's corpse up the chimney as it
was found; and the...

Page 126

...call your attention to three points.
The voice is termed by one witness 'harsh rather than...

Page 127

..._must_ have passed, then, through those of the back room.
Now, brought to this conclusion in...

Page 128

...other window. Supposing, then,
the springs upon each sash to be the same, as was probable,...

Page 129

...Upon this point I had
been satisfied in my walk with you around the building. About...

Page 130

...been accomplished:--but, secondly and _chiefly_, I
wish to impress upon your understanding the _very extraordinary_--the
almost præternatural...

Page 131

...as
remarkable as this (the delivery of the money, and murder committed
within three days upon the...

Page 132

...deeds. Of the bruises upon the body
of Madame L'Espanaye I do not speak. Monsieur Dumas,...

Page 133

...There is no _slipping_ apparent. Each finger has
retained--possibly until the death of the victim--the fearful...

Page 134

...intelligible to the
understanding of another. We will call them guesses then, and speak
of them as...

Page 135

...animal, it would
be impossible to prove me cognizant of the murder, or to implicate me
in...

Page 136

...at all this trouble for nothing, sir,"
said the man. "Couldn't expect it. Am very willing...

Page 137

...it."

What he stated was, in substance, this. He had lately made a voyage
to the Indian...

Page 138

...shutter was kicked open again by
the Ourang-Outang as it entered the room.

The sailor, in the...

Page 139

...The fury of the beast, who no doubt bore
still in mind the dreaded whip, was...

Page 140

...TO "THE MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE."


Es giebt eine Reihe idealischer Begebenheiten, die...

Page 141

...saw so long ago.

Upon the winding up of the tragedy involved in the deaths of...

Page 142

...his liberal proposals were accepted eagerly by the
girl, although with somewhat more of hesitation by...

Page 143

...a reward; and
even then this reward was limited to a thousand francs. In the mean...

Page 144

...was concerned. The eyes of the public were upon him; and
there was really no sacrifice...

Page 145

...similar circumstances before,) he did not think
it necessary to keep his promise. As night drew...

Page 146

...dress was much torn and otherwise disordered. In the outer garment,
a slip, about a foot...

Page 147

...no person, whatever, come forward, so far, who
saw her at all, on that day, after...

Page 148

...body was that of Marie Rogêt? He ripped up the gown sleeve,
and says he found...

Page 149

...member of the family attended the
ceremonial:--although, I say, all this was asserted by L'Etoile in
furtherance...

Page 150

...who saw her outside of her mother's door, and
there is no evidence, except the testimony...

Page 151

...were on the thorn bush, about a foot from
the ground..... There can be no doubt,...

Page 152

...perusal of
my notes, "that this is a far more intricate case than that of the
Rue...

Page 153

...inquiries from the body found,
and thence tracing a murderer, we yet discover this body to...

Page 154

...body
into the river before midnight.' We demand at once, and very naturally,
why? Why is it...

Page 155

...day or night, as the most
obvious and most immediate mode of disposal. You will understand...

Page 156

...in general, is neither much
lighter nor much heavier than the water of the Seine; that...

Page 157

...specific gravity again becomes less
than that of the bulk of water which it displaces. This...

Page 158

...that 'drowned bodies'
require from six to ten days for sufficient decomposition to take place
to bring...

Page 159

...have appeared. He is accordingly in haste to show that it
was not kept on shore;...

Page 160

...by Beauvais. In regard to the hair upon the
arm, L'Etoile has been obviously disingenuous. M....

Page 161

...Each successive one
is multiple evidence--proof not _added_ to proof, but multiplied by
hundreds or thousands. Let...

Page 162

...or the ill-disposed.
M. Beauvais (as it appears from your notes) had some personal interviews
with the...

Page 163

...gang of low ruffians not far from
her mother's door. 'It is impossible,' it urges, 'that...

Page 164

...says Le Commerciel, 'that she went out.' But not so. It was
at nine o'clock in...

Page 165

...she any when
found? These are important questions utterly untouched by the evidence;
and there are others...

Page 166

...it. While you ascertain the validity of the affidavits, I will
examine the newspapers more generally...

Page 167

...her parasol. She
returned for it, was seized by the gang, carried out into the stream,
gagged,...

Page 168

...the result of new proposals by a
second individual--we are prepared to regard it as a...

Page 169

...intention when leaving home, and of the surprise and suspicion
aroused in the bosom of her...

Page 170

...the popular opinion,
under certain conditions, is not to be disregarded. When arising of
itself--when manifesting itself...

Page 171

...three or four large stones, forming a kind of seat with a back and
footstool. On...

Page 172

...of the
period of the murder,) as much as two or three inches in a single...

Page 173

...restraints and conventionalities of society. He desires
less the fresh air and the green trees, than...

Page 174

...upon its natural throne? Those who would hesitate at such
a wager, have either never been...

Page 175

...edges to the fabric--if, for
example, it be a pocket-handkerchief, and it is desired to tear...

Page 176

...of Paris. Not that the matter might not have been as
inferred, but that there was...

Page 177

...water his
fears redouble within him. The sounds of life encompass his path. A
dozen times he...

Page 178

...men
have so dragged a corpse at all as to have left evident traces of the
dragging?

"And...

Page 179

...arising, as we have imagined, after quitting
the thicket, (if the thicket it was), and on...

Page 180

...just as I have employed them in this conversation
with yourself, no notice whatever of the...

Page 181

...most probably have disposed
of both in the same way. But it may be said that...

Page 182

...shall
infallibly trace this boat; for not only can the bargeman who picked
it up identify it,...

Page 183

...is in the daily habit of frequenting
--at a locality, perhaps, which his duty compels him...

Page 184

...parallel, or even to suggest that the measures adopted
in Paris for the discovery of the...

Page 185

...based, renders it expedient
to give them, and also to say a few words in explanation...

Page 186

...by Express, _via_ Norfolk!--The Atlantic
crossed in Three Days! Signal Triumph of Mr. Monck...

Page 187

...Henson and Sir George
Cayley--had much weakened the public interest in the subject of aerial
navigation. Mr....

Page 188

...rigged on to the balloon itself with
a network in the customary manner. From this framework...

Page 189

...some unusually profound principle in dynamics.

"So well satisfied, however, was Mr. Mason of the ultimate...

Page 190

...was exhausted by ballast, arranged
in bags of different sizes, with their respective weights marked upon
them--by...

Page 191

...the
ground of just so much of the end of the rope as is necessary. If,
on...

Page 192

...doubt, a thrillingly
interesting account of the voyage.

"THE JOURNAL.

"_Saturday, April the 6th_.--Every preparation likely to embarrass...

Page 193

...into requisition forthwith, for the purpose of altering
our direction more to the eastward, and in...

Page 194

...the gale freshened, we flew with a velocity nearly inconceivable; the
guide-rope flying out behind the...

Page 195

...with any other
phenomenon presenting itself. The waters give up no voice to
the heavens. The immense...

Page 196

...feet elevation the sky appears nearly black, and the stars are
distinctly visible; while the sea...

Page 197

...fort,
thronged out, of course, to see the balloon; but it was with the
greatest difficulty that...

Page 198

... --Quinault--Atys.

OF my country and of my family I have little to say. Ill usage...

Page 199

...the first we had seen since our departure from Batavia.
I watched it attentively until sunset,...

Page 200

...at first, struck with the idea of
our being among breakers; so terrific, beyond the wildest...

Page 201

...light, properly so called, but a dull and sullen glow
without reflection, as if all its...

Page 202

...As he spoke, I became
aware of a dull, sullen glare of red light which streamed...

Page 203

...vague novelty, doubt, and apprehension. I
therefore thought proper to contrive a hiding-place in the hold....

Page 204

...enclose the MS. in a bottle, and cast it within the sea.

* * * *...

Page 205

...utterly unconscious of my presence. Like
the one I had at first seen in the hold,...

Page 206

...a sense--a
sentiment ineffable. His forehead, although little wrinkled, seems to
bear upon it the stamp of...

Page 207

...are hurrying onwards
to some exciting knowledge--some never-to-be-imparted secret, whose
attainment is destruction. Perhaps this current leads...

Page 208

...the heavy shutters of the room--since it was
already night--to light the tongues of a tall...

Page 209

...of the countenance, which had so suddenly and so vehemently moved
me. Least of all, could...

Page 210

...who so loved him, yet who grew daily more dispirited
and weak. And in sooth some...