The Raven and The Philosophy of Composition

By Edgar Allan Poe

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...The Raven
...

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... ...

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...first, cast about him for some mode of
accounting for what had been done.”

I cannot think...

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...peep behind the scenes, at the
elaborate and vacillating crudities of thought—at the true purposes
seized only...

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...to say, of brief poetical effects. It
is needless to demonstrate that a poem is such,...

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...which is experienced in
consequence of contemplating “the beautiful.” Now I designate Beauty as
the province of...

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...I resolved to diversify, and so heighten, the effect, by
adhering, in general, to the monotone...

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...word, “Nevermore,” at the conclusion
of each stanza, in a poem of melancholy tone, and in...

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...the utmost conceivable amount of
sorrow and despair.

Here, then, the poem may be said to have...

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...second of seven and a half (in effect
two-thirds)—the third of eight—the fourth of seven and...

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...deepening the ultimate impression. For
example, an air of the fantastic—approaching as nearly to the ludicrous
as...

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...storm, to seek admission
at a window from which a light still gleams,—the chamber-window of a
student,...

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...seek a moral in all that has been
previously narrated. The reader begins now to regard...

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...there and nothing more.

[Illustration: _Copyright 1906 by The Harwell-Evans Co._]

[Illustration]

Deep into that darkness peering,...

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...as my hopes have flown before.”
Then the bird said, “Nevermore.”

[Illustration:...

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... Quoth the Raven, “Nevermore.”

[Illustration: _Copyright 1906 by The Harwell-Evans Co._]

[Illustration]

“Be that word our...