The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket Comprising the details of a mutiny and atrocious butchery on board the American brig Grampus, on her way to the South Seas, in the month of June, 1827.

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 159

the
appellation of the island we had left was _Tsalal_. The commencement of
the words _Tsalemon_ and _Tsalal_ was given with a prolonged hissing
sound, which we found it impossible to imitate, even after repeated
endeavours, and which was precisely the same with the note of the black
bittern we had eaten upon the summit of the hill.

_March 3._ The heat of the water was now truly remarkable, and its
colour was undergoing a rapid change, being no longer transparent, but
of a milky consistency and hue. In our immediate vicinity it was
usually smooth, never so rough as to endanger the canoe--but we were
frequently surprised at perceiving, to our right and left, at different
distances, sudden and extensive agitations of the surface--these, we at
length noticed, were always preceded by wild flickerings in the region
of vapour to the southward.

_March 4._ To-day, with the view of widening our sail, the breeze from
the northward dying away perceptibly, I took from my coat-pocket a
white handkerchief. Nu-Nu was seated at my elbow, and the linen
accidentally flaring in his face, he became violently affected with
convulsions. These were succeeded by drowsiness and stupor, and low
murmurings of Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!

_March 5._ The wind had entirely ceased, but it was evident that we
were still hurrying on to the southward, under the influence of a
powerful current. And now, indeed, it would seem reasonable that we
should experience some alarm at the turn events were taking--but we
felt none. The countenance of Peters indicated nothing of this nature,
although it wore at times an expression I could not fathom. The Polar
winter appeared to be coming on--but coming without its terrors. I felt
a _numbness_ of body and mind--a dreaminess of sensation--but this was
all.

_March 6._ The gray vapour had now arisen many more degrees above the
horizon, and was gradually losing its grayness of tint. The heat of the
water was extreme, even unpleasant to the touch, and its milky hue was
more evident than ever. To-day a violent agitation of the water
occurred very close to the canoe. It was attended, as usual, with a
wild flaring up of the vapour at its summit, and a momentary division
at its base. A fine white powder, resembling ashes--but certainly not
such--fell over the canoe and over a large surface of the water, as the
flickering died away among the vapour and the commotion subsided in the
sea. Nu-Nu now threw himself on his face in the bottom of the boat, and
no persuasions could induce him to arise.

_March 7._ This day we questioned Nu-Nu concerning

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Text Comparison with Eureka: A Prose Poem

Page 11
In combining the two modes of discussion to which I have referred, I propose to avail myself of the advantages peculiar to each--and very especially of the _iteration in detail_ which will be unavoidable as a consequence of the plan.
Page 16
Now, of these atoms, thus diffused, or upon diffusion, what conditions are we permitted--not to assume, but to infer, from consideration as well of their source as of the character of the design apparent in their diffusion? _Unity_ being their source, and _difference from Unity_ the character of the design manifested in their diffusion, we are warranted in supposing this character to be at least _generally_ preserved throughout the design, and to form a portion of the design itself:--that is to say, we shall be warranted in conceiving continual differences at all points from the uniquity and simplicity of the origin.
Page 18
Man neither employs, nor knows, a force sufficient to bring two atoms into contact.
Page 20
Here, then, is an _in_coincidence.
Page 24
_This_ they seek always--immediately--in all directions--wherever it is even partially to be found; thus appeasing, in some measure, the ineradicable tendency, while on the way to its absolute satisfaction in the end.
Page 28
In saying, generally, that the irradiation proceeds in direct proportion with the squares of the distances, we use the term irradiation to express _the degree of the diffusion_ as we proceed outwardly from the centre.
Page 31
_ Now, Reaction, as far as we know anything of it, is Action conversed.
Page 32
For, in fact, the tendency to the general centre is not to a centre as such, but because of its being a point in tending towards which each atom tends most directly to its real and essential centre, _Unity_--the absolute and final Union of all.
Page 36
I maintain, first, that _only_ in the mode described is it conceivable that Matter could have been diffused so as to fulfil at once the conditions of irradiation and of generally equable distribution.
Page 42
--This planet was Neptune.
Page 58
The appearance of this cluster of clusters, to our eyes, _as_ a belt or band, is altogether a perspective phaenomenon of the same character as that which causes us to behold our own individual and roughly-spherical cluster, the Galaxy, under guise also of a belt, traversing the Heavens at right angles to the Universal one.
Page 59
That this _may_ be so, who shall venture to deny? I maintain, simply, that we have not even the shadow of a reason for believing that it _is_ so.
Page 62
They control _the Universe_.
Page 77
On the part of Herschell, however, there is evidently _a reluctance_ to regard the nebulae as in "a state of progressive collapse.
Page 80
--Touching comets, in general, let me here suggest, in passing, that we cannot be far wrong in looking upon them as the _lightning-flashes of the cosmical Heaven_.
Page 82
Through the aid--by the means--through the agency of Matter, and by dint of its heterogeneity--is this Ether manifested--is _Spirit individualized_.
Page 83
Now the very definition of Attraction implies particularity--the existence of parts, particles, or atoms; for we define it as the tendency of "each atom &c.
Page 85
An Intelligence exists greater than your own; and it is only through this Intelligence you live at all.
Page 95
It contains a great deal of information.
Page 101
By Miss Sedgwick.