The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket Comprising the details of a mutiny and atrocious butchery on board the American brig Grampus, on her way to the South Seas, in the month of June, 1827.

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 115

overruling considerations obliged him
to retreat, he could have penetrated, if not to the pole itself, at
least to the eighty-fifth parallel. I have given his ideas respecting
these matters somewhat at length, that the reader may have an
opportunity of seeing how far they were borne out by my own subsequent
experience.

In 1831, Captain Briscoe, in the employ of the Messieurs Enderby,
whale-ship owners of London, sailed in the brig Lively for the South
Seas, accompanied by the cutter Tula. On the twenty-eighth of February,
being in latitude 66° 30' S., longitude 47° 31' E., he descried land,
and "clearly discovered through the snow the black peaks of a range of
mountains running E. S. E." He remained in this neighbourhood during
the whole of the following month, but was unable to approach the coast
nearer than within ten leagues, owing to the boisterous state of the
weather. Finding it impossible to make farther discovery during this
season, he returned northward to winter in Van Diemen's Land.

In the beginning of 1832 he again proceeded southwardly, and on the
fourth of February land was seen to the southeast in latitude 67° 15',
longitude 69° 29' W. This was soon found to be an island near the
headland of the country he had first discovered. On the twenty-first of
the month he succeeded in landing on the latter, and took possession of
it in the name of William IV., calling it Adelaide's Island, in honour
of the English queen. These particulars being made known to the Royal
Geographical Society of London, the conclusion was drawn by that body
"that there is a continuous tract of land extending from 47° 30' E. to
69° 29' W. longitude, running the parallel of from sixty-six to
sixty-seven degrees south latitude." In respect to this conclusion Mr.
Reynolds observes, "In the correctness of it we by no means concur; nor
do the discoveries of Briscoe warrant any such inference. It was within
these limits that Weddell proceeded south on a meridian to the east of
Georgia, Sandwich Land, and the South Orkney and Shetland Islands." My
own experience will be found to testify most directly to the falsity of
the conclusion arrived at by the society.

These are the principal attempts which have been made at penetrating to
a high southern latitude, and it will now be seen that there remained,
previous to the voyage of the Jane, nearly three hundred degrees of
longitude in which the Antarctic circle had not been crossed at all. Of
course a wide field lay before us for discovery, and it was with
feelings of

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