The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket Comprising the details of a mutiny and atrocious butchery on board the American brig Grampus, on her way to the South Seas, in the month of June, 1827.

By Edgar Allan Poe

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...THE NARRATIVE OF ARTHUR GORDON PYM.

OF NANTUCKET.


COMPRISING THE DETAILS OF A MUTINY AND ATROCIOUS BUTCHERY...

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...those gentlemen in Virginia who expressed the greatest interest
in my statement, more particularly in regard...

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...own commences; the difference in point of style will be readily
perceived.

A. G. PYM.

New-York, July, 1838.




NARRATIVE...

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...Augustus and myself were not a little intoxicated
towards the close of it. As usual, in...

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...word since casting loose from the
wharf. I now asked my companion what course he intended...

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...its usual effect--the mental energy began to yield before its
influence--and the confused perception which he...

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...to a
ringbolt in the deck of the cuddy. Having thus arranged everything as
well as I...

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...angry, and, after a while, said
that "it was no business of his to be eternally...

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...manner to the smooth and shining bottom
(the Penguin was coppered and copper-fastened), and beating violently
against...

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...a rope to the floating timber. This rope, it
will be remembered, I had myself tied...

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...the Penguin before he became
fully aware of his condition. In regard to myself--I was resuscitated
from...

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...It is strange, too, that he most strongly enlisted
my feelings in behalf of the life...

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...made use of for the furtherance of my project--an hypocrisy pervading
every word and action of...

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...but, as there was now a thick
fog in our favour, it was agreed to lose...

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...high, and, in short, everything
appeared of a more roomy and agreeable nature than I had...

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...high, and full six long, but very narrow. Two
large empty oil-casks lay on the top...

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...of June.

I remained three days and nights (as nearly as I could guess) in my
hiding-place...

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...light with great care, and soon fell into a
sound slumber.

Upon awaking I felt strangely confused...

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...suffering me to remain so long a prisoner,
except, indeed, his having suddenly died or fallen...

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...of terror, I at last found myself partially
awake. My dream, then, was not all a...

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...creature more truly deserve it. For seven years he
had been my inseparable companion, and in...

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...at all, and very
frequently my limbs sank suddenly from beneath me; when, falling
prostrate on my...

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...force the crate from its ground, I felt a strong vibration in the
side next me....

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...and there either yield to my sad fate, or
try so to tranquillize my mind as...

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...spot where I had
deposited them. But now I endeavoured in vain to call it to...

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...note of my friend, if indeed it were a note
from him, seemed only likely to...

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...only one side of the paper. I shall not attempt to describe my
feelings of rage...

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...unevenness on its
surface, which a delicate sense of feeling might enable me to detect. I
determined...

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...could not succeed in this directly,
of trying to cut my way through the orlop deck....

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...of a singular hissing
sound close at my ears, and discovered it to proceed from Tiger,...

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...Despair gave me strength, and I rose bodily
up, shaking him from me by main force,...

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...At length I again heard
the word _Arthur!_ repeated in a low tone, and one full...

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...back if he discovered me to be on
board. Besides, upon thinking the matter over, Augustus,...

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...nature, and he could not suppose that I had undergone
any inconvenience from my incarceration. He...

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...and
for a moment it seemed possible that the brig might be retaken. The
mutineers, however, succeeded...

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...connected in some
manner with the Indian trading-posts on Lewis river. Peters himself was
one of the...

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...hopelessness of obtaining credence for all that I
shall tell, yet confidently trusting in time and...

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...way from the Cape Verd Islands to Porto Rico. No
attention was paid to Augustus, who...

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...proved
the ultimate means of my relief, as will presently appear.




CHAPTER V.


For some minutes after the...

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...with Dirk Peters, and had given
him up for lost, supposing him to have been thrown...

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...me before dawn, as
the chief difficulty lay in passing through the close stowage in the
lower...

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...close."_

The slip of paper being tied upon the dog, he was now put down the
hatchway,...

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...perfect
security and freedom from all restraint to be enjoyed, but, more
particularly, on the deliciousness of...

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...of certainty. He determined,
nevertheless, to force a passage, if possible, to the box, and at...

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...open for many months
previous. Add to these considerations that of the scene of bloodshed
and terror...

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...of us could endure to think of; yet, how to act
otherwise was the question. He...

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...only to
the bulk taken in, but to the nature of the bulk, and whether there...

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...say that at least one half of the
instances in which vessels have foundered in heavy...

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...not much more than half fill the
vessel. For the first portion of the voyage he...

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...in which case all would have been discovered, and our
lives would, no doubt, have been...

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...with great apparent
eagerness. During the day he regained all his former vigour and
appetite. His strange...

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...with the mutineers on a kind of exploring and pleasure voyage in
those quarters, and said...

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...had a long conversation
this day with Augustus, and told him that two of his gang,...

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...pressing the matter any further, or from saying anything to the
cook. It was well, as...

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...that no opportunity could be more favourable than the present
for carrying our design into effect,...

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...in various manners. In moderate weather,
it is frequently done with a view of merely bringing...

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...of
the waves. In this situation a good vessel will ride out a very heavy
gale of...

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...during the
morning, having been attacked two days before with spasms after
drinking some spirits and water....

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...he could utter a
single cry, tossed him over the bulwarks. He then called to us,...

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...could scarcely summon
resolution to go on with my part. It was necessary, however, to act
with...

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...my mind, however, to sell my life
as dearly as possible, and not to suffer myself...

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...nerve myself to the
task of descending among the mutineers when Peters should make a signal
to...

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...entire inaccessibility on account of the gale, confined
the apparently possible means of deception within such...

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...us. These three men were ---- Jones, ---- Greely, and Absalom
Hicks. Jones had thrown Augustus...

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...that something should be done with a
view of easing her in some measure. At almost...

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...To add to our distress, a heavy sea, striking
the brig to windward, threw her off...

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...strong,
being rigged as I have never seen one rigged either before or since.
Down its main...

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...we were encircled with a towering ridge of
foam, a portion of which swept over us...

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...seas, which roared in every direction
around us and above us, would drive the hulk so...

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...birds,
balloons, people on horseback, carriages driving furiously, and similar
moving objects, presented themselves in endless succession....

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...numbness presently began to die away, so that I could
move first one of my legs,...

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...other with the aid of the broken
ropes about the windlass, and devising methods of escape...

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...to get up something by diving
into the cabin. This proposition we hailed with all the...

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...with the two first, and it
now became evident that nothing could be done in this...

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...of miles off. I
sprung to my feet as if a musket bullet had suddenly struck...

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...so as
to display a set of the most brilliantly white teeth. As his vessel
drew nearer,...

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...at
once the origin of the sound. We saw the tall stout figure still
leaning on the...

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...possibly have found
means of boarding her, had not our sudden disappointment, and the
appalling nature of...

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...renew our attempts at getting up provision from the hull.

It was now a dead calm,...

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...fastened it on and went down for the third time, when I became
fully satisfied that...

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...should spring up,
for in our present exhausted condition we could have no hope of living
through...

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...in a case where the patient was suffering from _mania à
potu_.

Finding that I could now...

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...and
uttering the most absurd platitudes. At intervals, however, they would
appear to revive suddenly, as if...

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...most extravagant demonstrations of joy, weeping,
laughing in an idiotic manner, jumping, stamping upon the deck,...

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...took Parker
aside; and mentally praying to God for power to dissuade him from the
horrible purpose...

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...I would not hesitate to throw him into the
sea. Upon this he immediately seized me...

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...we could devise for the terrific lottery, in which we were to
take each a chance,...

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...placed in a situation precisely similar to my own.

At length delay was no longer possible,...

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...we contrived to catch some water by means of a sheet
which had been fished up...

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...opening sufficiently large to admit of a free access to the
storeroom. This consideration, however, did...

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...even disgusting. Their steps are very slow, measured, and
heavy, their bodies being carried about a...

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...had been brought up before from the cabin. Having done
this, we broke off the neck...

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...before,
awaited the event with far more calmness than could have been
anticipated, or would have been...

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...in the
storeroom. After a great deal of hard labour during the whole day, we
found that...

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...long as
possible, we cut it into fine pieces, and filled with them our three
remaining olive-jars...

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...had so great an effect upon our spirits
that we sat motionless by the corpse during...

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...and much wounded, he
persisted in his attempts to push in where we were. A cloud...

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...rocking furiously from side to side, and the sea in
all directions around was much agitated,...

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...except for the disappearance of the bedclothes
by which we had been hitherto enabled to catch...

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...as
to let the grateful fluid trickle into our mouths. In this occupation
we passed the entire...

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...and was finally capsized; but, the
mast going by the board, she afterward righted. They remained...

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...have
desired.

Captain Guy was a gentleman of great urbanity of manner, and of
considerable experience in the...

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...degree of difference in the exchange. Thus, in my
own case, I now feel it impossible...

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...breach over us as we lay. The
blow from the southwest, however, luckily proved to be...

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...to distinguish the harbour. Its projecting point
terminates in a high rock, through which is a...

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...properly cooked, are
palatable food. In flying they sometimes sail very close to the surface
of the...

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...to partition out the whole area into small squares
exactly equal in size. This is done...

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...mate,
Mr. Patterson, took the boats, and (although it was somewhat early in
the season) went in...

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...each other about
ten miles, there being fine open passages between. The land in all of
them...

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...hundred, and says that he would have had no
difficulty in loading a large ship with...

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...ivory. We
remained here a week, during which the prevailing winds were from the
northward and westward,...

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...Aurora, in 1774; the brig Pearl, in 1779; and the ship
Dolores, in 1790. They all...

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...with the resolution of penetrating
in that course as far as possible. Before entering upon this...

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...the southern horizon. The northern edge of this expanse
was ragged and broken, so firmly wedged...

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...only three islands of ice were
visible. It is somewhat remarkable that, although vast flocks of...

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...overruling considerations obliged him
to retreat, he could have penetrated, if not to the pole itself,...

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...most intense interest that I heard Captain Guy express his
resolution of pushing boldly to the...

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...The sea in which we now were was thickly covered with ice
islands, but had no...

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...temperature of the air was forty-seven, that of the water
thirty-four. We now sailed to the...

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...schooner, towing our trophy behind us. This bear, upon
admeasurement, proved to be full fifteen feet...

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...of the compass. The sky was usually
clear, with now and then a slight appearance of...

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...hawthorn, and the carcass of a
singular-looking land-animal. It was three feet in length, and but...

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...all at once, intermingled with occasional shouts, in
which we could distinguish the words _Anamoo-moo!_ and...

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...remaining about
fifty yards off. Twenty of the savages now got on board, and proceeded
to ramble...

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...prevail upon him to
take another look; but, throwing himself upon the floor, with his face
buried...

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...might. Accordingly we made every
necessary preparation, and, under the guidance of Too-wit, got the Jane
through...

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...water would do so, yet
never, except when falling in a cascade, had it the customary
appearance...

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...through a precipitous ravine, we at length reached what we
were told was the only collection...

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...those of the antelope. Its motion was
exceedingly awkward and indecisive, and we never saw it...

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...were never disclosed. Their hair was of a finer
texture than that of the males. Among...

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...what he had to say by a
present of several strings of blue beads and a...

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...the schooner, and parted with Too-wit after
obtaining from him a promise that he would bring...

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...the erection of suitable
houses in which to cure the article, and for the services of...

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...inches in length; and I have seen a few that were not less
than two feet...

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...agreement having been thus entered into, we proceeded immediately to
land everything necessary for preparing the...

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...approach the vessel during our absence, under any pretence
whatever, and to remain constantly on deck....

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...ever ventured, under any
circumstances, so completely into the power of unknown savages as to
permit them...

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...length succeeded. I then remained
motionless for some moments, endeavouring to conceive what had happened
to me,...

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...experienced
some relief from the excessive oppression of lungs which had tormented
us. Presently we were enabled...

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...blue sky, at the extremity of a
thickly-wooded ravine. Looking back now, with somewhat more leisure,...

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...marks left in the soil resembling
those made by the drill of the rock-blaster, that stakes...

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...with a view of lending their aid in
the capture and plunder of the Jane. The...

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...too, were now quickly filled
with natives, starting up from the bushes at the head of...

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...direction, screaming and yelling for aid. This
great success, however, came too late for the salvation...

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...some of the savages who might be
still lurking in the neighbourhood. A stab with a...

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...her, hammering with large stones,
axes, and cannon balls at the bolts and other copper and...

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...the ground, but could not
immediately make out what it was. At length we saw that...

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...at descending.

We commenced by going down the southern declivity, which seemed to
offer the fewest difficulties,...

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...of escape, but to
no purpose. We also descended the chasm in which we had been
overwhelmed,...

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...of
subsequent adventure, and to which I am indebted for memoranda of many
subjects which would otherwise...

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...the
_cul-de-sac_. With a very slight exertion of the imagination, the left,
or most northerly of these...

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...hazard of the attempt can scarcely be
conceived; but, as there was no other resource, we...

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...After throwing down the musket found in the chasm, I
fastened this rope to the bushes,...

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...suggestion he could devise; although my confusion of
mind had been so great as to prevent...

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...precipice that I
cast it aside as useless, preferring to trust my pistols, which had
been carefully...

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...beasts. We were upon the point of
turning upon our steps, and trying to secure a...

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...to despatch them
with our knives. We were now clear off, and making great way out...

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...to be left open for hope. We resolved to steer boldly to the
southward, where there...

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...group in sight. This being
done, we turned the bow full to the southward. The weather...

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...the
appellation of the island we had left was _Tsalal_. The commencement of
the words _Tsalemon_ and...

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...the motives of his
countrymen in destroying our companions; but he appeared to be too
utterly overcome...

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...where a chasm threw itself open to
receive us. But there arose in our pathway a...

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...assertion is made in a manner so simple, and sustained by a
species of demonstration so...

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...from the vapoury _white_ curtain of the South. Nothing _white_
was to be found at Tsalal,...