The Complete Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe Including Essays on Poetry

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 120

RIVER


Fair river! in thy bright, clear flow
Of crystal, wandering water,
Thou art an emblem of the glow
Of beauty--the unhidden heart--
The playful maziness of art
In old Alberto's daughter;

But when within thy wave she looks--
Which glistens then, and trembles--
Why, then, the prettiest of brooks
Her worshipper resembles;
For in his heart, as in thy stream,
Her image deeply lies--
His heart which trembles at the beam
Of her soul-searching eyes.


1829.





* * * * *





SONG.


I saw thee on thy bridal day--
When a burning blush came o'er thee,
Though happiness around thee lay,
The world all love before thee:

And in thine eye a kindling light
(Whatever it might be)
Was all on Earth my aching sight
Of Loveliness could see.

That blush, perhaps, was maiden shame--
As such it well may pass--
Though its glow hath raised a fiercer flame
In the breast of him, alas!

Who saw thee on that bridal day,
When that deep blush _would_ come o'er thee,
Though happiness around thee lay,
The world all love before thee.


1827.





* * * * *





SPIRITS OF THE DEAD.


Thy soul shall find itself alone
'Mid dark thoughts of the gray tombstone
Not one, of all the crowd, to pry
Into thine hour of secrecy.
Be silent in that solitude
Which is not loneliness--for then
The spirits of the dead who stood
In life before thee are again
In death around thee--and their will
Shall overshadow thee: be still.
The night--tho' clear--shall frown--
And the

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Text Comparison with First Project Gutenberg Collection of Edgar Allan Poe

Page 0
Hart, hart@pobox.
Page 1
"Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see, then, what thereat is and this mystery explore-- Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;-- 'Tis the wind and nothing more.
Page 2
" Then the bird said "Nevermore.
Page 3
" "Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil!--prophet still, if bird or devil!-- Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate,.
Page 4
" And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadows on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted--nevermore! The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe October, 1997 [Etext #1064]* The Masque of the Red Death The "Red Death".
Page 5
When his dominions were half depopulated, he summoned to his presence a thousand hale and light-hearted friends from among the knights and dames of his court, and with these retired to the deep seclusion of one of his castellated abbeys.
Page 6
But in the corridors that followed the suite, there stood, opposite to each window, a heavy tripod, bearing a brazier of fire, that projected its rays through the tinted glass and so glaringly illumined the room.
Page 7
There were arabesque figures with unsuited limbs and appointments.
Page 8
And the revel went whirlingly on, until at length there commenced the sounding of midnight upon the clock.
Page 9
The figure was tall and gaunt, and shrouded from head to foot in the habiliments of the grave.
Page 10
I must not only punish, but punish with impunity.
Page 11
Few Italians have the true virtuoso spirit.
Page 12
These orders were sufficient, I well knew, to insure their immediate disappearance, one and all, as soon as my back was turned.
Page 13
I looked at him in surprise.
Page 14
From one of these depended a short chain, from the other a padlock.
Page 15
It was now midnight, and my task was drawing to a close.
Page 16
My heart grew sick on account of the dampness of the catacombs.