The Complete Poetical Works of Edgar Allan Poe Including Essays on Poetry

By Edgar Allan Poe

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...and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.




...

Page 1

...Annie
To F----
To Frances S. Osgood
Eldorado
Eulalie
A...

Page 2

...find that when her
husband died, after a few years of married life, the young widow...

Page 3

...the nightly summons to
bed; the connings, the recitations, the periodical half-holidays and
...

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...to pay up our small bets.
Poe ran well, but his competitor was a...

Page 5

...bad. Of Edgar Poe," who
had then resumed his parental cognomen, "it was known...

Page 6

...was rescued by a boat just
as he was succumbing. On getting ashore Poe was seized...

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...returned home in a dream, with but one thought, one hope in life
--to hear...

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...of
his boyish ideal, Byron. This passion, he remarks, "if passion it can
properly be called, was...

Page 9

...that
time the highest honor a student could obtain. The present regulations
in...

Page 10

...was
trying 'to divide his mind,' to carry on a conversation and write
sensibly upon a totally...

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...printed "for
private circulation only." This was towards the end of 1827, when he was
nearing nineteen....

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...a military school in many respects equal to the best in Europe
for the education of...

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...became first a
paid contributor, and eventually the editor of the publication, which
ultimately he rendered one...

Page 14

...contributing to its
columns much of his best work; ultimately, however, he came to
loggerheads with its...

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...ciphers more or less
abstruse, demanding solution. In the correspondence which ensued in
'Graham's Magazine' and other...

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...agonies of her death--and at each accession of the disorder I loved
her more...

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...in those days. And he would not allow a word about the danger of
...

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...Poe relinquished his laborious and ill-paid work on
the 'Evening Mirror', his marvellous poem of "The...

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...former power.

For another year or so Poe lived quietly at Fordham, guarded by the
watchful care...

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...registered
the proffered vote, quite regardless of the condition of the person
personifying a voter. The election...

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... ...

Page 22

...I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten...

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...and this mystery explore;--
'Tis the wind and nothing more."

...

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... door;
Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
...

Page 25

... Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting,...

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...a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic fire
Leaping higher, higher, higher,
...

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...sobbing of the bells;
Keeping time, time, time,
As he knells,...

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... And nebulous lustre was born,
Out of which a miraculous crescent
...

Page 29

...is written, sweet sister,
On the door of this legended tomb?"
...

Page 30

...roses?
No footstep stirred: the hated world all slept,
Save only thee and...

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...many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
...

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... * * ...

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...Bubbles--ephemeral and _so_ transparent--
But _this is_, now--you may depend...

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...heart:--ah, that horrible,
Horrible throbbing!

The sickness--the nausea--
...

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... That you fancy me dead--
And I rest so contentedly,
...

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... Had journeyed long,
Singing a song,
In search of...

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... Come never again,
For...

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...unhallowed bed
Lying down to die, have suddenly arisen
At thy soft-murmured words,...

Page 39

...strange city lying alone
Far down within the dim West,
Where the good...

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...June,
I stand beneath the mystic moon.
An opiate vapor, dewy, dim,
...

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...out whose sounding door
She ne'er shall force an echo more,
Thrilling to...

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...is the most effective single example of
'fugitive poetry' ever published in this country,...

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... * * ...

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...into various publications with the
name of the editor, N. P. Willis, appended, and was ascribed...

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... * * ...

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...proprietor's daughter. Slightly revised,
the poem reappeared in Burton's 'Gentleman's Magazine' for August, 1839,
as "To----."



* ...

Page 47

...the 1831 volume of Poems by Poe: it reappeared as
"The City of Sin," in the...

Page 48

...that died, and died so young?"

_Peccavimus;_ but rave not thus! and let a...

Page 49

...what ethereal dances,
By what eternal streams!

Alas! for that accursed...

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...rule
With a despotic sway all giant minds.
We are not impotent--we pallid...

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...entombed.

And travellers, now, within that valley,
Through the red-litten windows...

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...Worm.


1838





* *...

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... By the dismal tarns and pools
Where dwell the Ghouls,--
...

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...heard my hymn!
In joy and wo--in good and ill--
Mother of God,...

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...then contained in Poe's favorite tale of "Ligeia,"
was first published in the 'American Museum' for...

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... Will make thee mine. Oh, I am very happy!

_Aless_. ...

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... Thy riotous company, too--fellows low...

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... He's not well!
...

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... But Rumor speaks of him...

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... From common passions.

_Di Brog_. ...

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...spirit of the western wind"
...

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... She died. Thus...

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...am sorry.
...

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... Would have given...

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... Inurned and...

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... Think of my early days!--think of my father
...

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...A crucifix whereon to register
...

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...thee now, Politian!
...

Page 69

... Alas! alas!
...

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... Of the hollow and high-sounding vanities
...

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...been kindled within it. Methinks the air
...

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... Be still!--the voice, if I mistake not greatly,
...

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... ...

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...These fancies to the wind. Remember, pray,
...

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...it Fate,
...

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...that--and thus I answer thee--
...

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...and with a tainted memory--
...

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... That we...

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... (_walks across and...

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... Of Heaven untrammelled flow--which air to breathe
...

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... Castiglione lives!

_Pol_. ...

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...is gone, he is gone--
...

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... _What_ didst thou say?
...

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... ...

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... At the Vatican.

...

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... Proud Earl!
...

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...feet of
the Earl._)
...

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... For public insult in the streets--before
...

Page 89

...her betrothed.



_Duke_. Why do you...

Page 90

... The Earl of Leicester! Yes!--is it he you mean?
...

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...arrived in Rome. Ha! ha! he _is_ altered!
...

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...Earl--but yet it is--and leaning
...

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... ...

Page 94

... ...

Page 95

...less just
the critique, and the converse. On this account, and because there are
but few B----s...

Page 96

...poet
would, I grant, make a false critique, and his self-love would
infallibly bias his little judgment...

Page 97

...see no reason, then, why our metaphysical poets should plume
themselves so much on the utility...

Page 98

...delicacy is the poet's own kingdom--his 'El
Dorado')--but they have the appearance of a better day...

Page 99

...sad tears does Betty shed....
She pats the pony, where or when
She...

Page 100

...'Give me,' I demanded of a
scholar some time ago, 'give me a definition of poetry.'
'_Tres-volontiers;_'...

Page 101

...her flood,
The Elfin from the green grass, and from me
The summer...

Page 102

...(Falling in wreaths thro' many a startled star,
Like woman's hair 'mid pearls, until,...

Page 103

...is given
To bear the Goddess' song, in odors, up to Heaven [10]:

...

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... Which dreamy poets name "the music of the sphere."
Ours is a world...

Page 105

...a pile
Of gorgeous columns on th' uuburthen'd air,
Flashing from Parian marble...

Page 106

...kiss'd her golden hair
And long'd to rest, yet could but sparkle there!

...

Page 107

...Or, capriciously still,
Like the lone Albatross, [23]
...

Page 108

... The rhythmical number
Which lull'd him to rest?"

...

Page 109

... She seemed not thus upon that autumn eve
I left her gorgeous halls--nor...

Page 110

...Be given our lady's bidding to discuss:
We came, my love; around, above, below,
...

Page 111

...The Humanitarians held that God was to be understood as
having really a human form.--'Vide Clarke's...

Page 112

...thought I could distinctly hear the sound of
the darkness as it stole over the horizon.]


[Footnote...

Page 113

... * * ...

Page 114

...leap within me at the cry)
The battle-cry of Victory!

The rain came...

Page 115

...fears
Of her--who asked no reason why,
But turned on me her quiet...

Page 116

...pride
Above all cities? in her hand
Their destinies? in all beside
...

Page 117

...burn below,
An humbler heart--a deeper woe.

Father, I firmly do believe--
...

Page 118

...day
The red sun-light lazily lay,
_Now_ each visitor shall confess
The...

Page 119

...burning measures suit--
Thy grief, thy joy, thy hate, thy love,
...

Page 120

...RIVER


Fair river! in thy bright, clear flow
Of crystal, wandering...

Page 121

...stars shall not look down
From their high thrones in the Heaven,
With...

Page 122

...Heaven on high
With tumult as they thunder by,
I have no time...

Page 123

... In spring of youth it was my lot
To haunt of the wide...

Page 124

...A mystery, and a dream,
Should my early life seem;
I say that...

Page 125

...day--the happiest hour
...

Page 126

... Like Harmodius, the gallant and good,
...

Page 127

...Of semblance with reality which brings
To the delirious eye, more lovely things
...

Page 128

...with a quickening spell doth o'er us pass
...

Page 129

... That ever died so young?


II. Her friends...

Page 130

... Thou diedst in thy life's June--
...

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...see:
Beauty's eye is here the bluest
In the falsest and untruest--
...

Page 132

...Time, and Destiny,
Were stalking between her and me.

...

Page 133

...cliff of the mountain--
From the sun that round me roll'd
In its...

Page 134

... Thy dreamy, passionate eyes,
...

Page 135

... (Enchantress!) this rude name of mine
...

Page 136

...rain in Autumn
On the dead leaves, cold and fast.

Underneath...

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...And the fine fibrils of its life
By the rude wrong of instant strife
...

Page 138

...and in order to satisfy
questioners, an editorial paragraph subsequently appeared, saying they
were by "A. Ide,...

Page 139

...proposition in this form
will be admitted at once by those who love the lyre for...

Page 140

...in the operations of Deity, it is scarcely
logical to imagine it confined to the regions...

Page 141

...to
me as I lay at length and glanced upward) there poured down noiselessly
and continuously into...

Page 142

...the few gentle Fays who
remain from the wreck of the race. Are these green tombs...

Page 143

...darker shade, which became
whelmed in a shadow more black. But at length, when the sun...

Page 144

...whispered that, of this
infinity of matter, the _sole_ purpose is to afford infinite...

Page 145

...aware that, as no thought can
perish, so no act is without infinite result....

Page 146

...their creation of
new_--until he found them reflected--unimpressive _at last_--back from
the throne...

Page 147

... * * ...

Page 148

...then, commence with
the moment of life's cessation--but commence with that sad, sad
...

Page 149

...general misrule served but to strengthen it by
opposition. Alas! we had fallen upon...

Page 150

...truly!--"_Que tout notre raisonnement se reduit a ceder au
sentiment;_" and it is not...

Page 151

...since elapsed, and whose conclusion brings up
together once more, tortured our slumbering senses...

Page 152

... themselves at my side were light or dark in shade--curved or angular
in...

Page 153

...heavy discomfort. It
oppressed my limbs with the oppression of some dull weight, and...

Page 154

... these deviations were omniprevalent--affected me just as violations of
abstract truth were wont...

Page 155

...blackness
and corruption, to my sad and solemn slumbers with the worm.

And...

Page 156

...and Harmony to penetrate most intimately into the soul,
taking the strongest hold upon...

Page 157

...in
the august and certain Present.


'Charmion'.

Grapple not now with such thoughts. To-morrow...

Page 158

..._them_ we should look for the agency of
the threatened fiery destruction had been...

Page 159

...freely permitted to rule the
reason and the fancy of the crowd. It was...

Page 160

...the strange
orb any _accustomed_ thoughts. Its _historical_ attributes had
disappeared. It oppressed...

Page 161

...such an elevation of the animal spirits as we had
latterly experienced. It was...

Page 162

...there will be
some to disbelieve and some to doubt, and yet a few who will...

Page 163

...the songs of
Anacreon--which are madness; and drank deeply--although the purple wine
reminded us of blood. For...

Page 164

...from our seats in
horror, and stand trembling, and shuddering, and aghast: for the tones
in the...

Page 165

...the thin ghastly mist, and was
crimson in color. And mine eyes fell upon a huge...

Page 166

...and called unto the hippopotami
which dwelt among the fens in the recesses of the morass....

Page 167

...the sybils; and holy,
holy things were heard of old by the dim leaves that trembled...

Page 168

...length. After the lapse of half an hour, at the
very utmost, it flags--fails--a revulsion ensues--and...

Page 169

...Even the Quarterlies have not
instructed us to be so impressed by it. _As yet_, they...

Page 170

... O, beloved as thou art!

O, lift me from the grass!
...

Page 171

...By man is cursed alway!


In this composition we find it difficult to recognise the Willis...

Page 172

...possible, is the exact
converse of the poetical. _He_ must be blind indeed who does not
perceive...

Page 173

...prescience of the glories beyond the grave, we struggle
by multiform combinations among the things and...

Page 174

...words, however, in explanation. _That_ pleasure which is at once
the most pure, the most elevating,...

Page 175

...and endeavor;
And to-night I long for rest.

Read from some...

Page 176

..."June." I quote only a portion of it:


There, through the long, long summer...

Page 177

...A feeling of sadness and longing
That is not akin to pain,
...

Page 178

...of American Letters, in conducting
the thing called 'The North American Review'. The poem just cited...

Page 179

...call'd me thy Angel in moments of bliss,
And thy Angel I'll be,'mid the...

Page 180

...youth and maidens gay,
And snowy plumes they wore;
It would...

Page 181

...death's mystery,
Swift to be hurl'd--
Anywhere, anywhere
Out of the world!

...

Page 182

...faults which so many could find;
Though thy soul with my grief was acquainted,
...

Page 183

...there still is a tree,
And a bird in the solitude singing,
...

Page 184

...for Supernal Beauty, the manifestation of
the Principle is always found in _an elevating excitement of...

Page 185

...strength, in the
altogether divine majesty of her _love._

Let me conclude by the recitation of yet...

Page 186

...is not altogether in
accordance with Mr. Dickens's idea--but the author of _Caleb Williams_
was too good...

Page 187

...full view--at the fully-matured
fancies discarded in despair as unmanageable--at the cautious selections
and rejections--at the painful...

Page 188

...through a psychal necessity, brief. For this reason, at least
one-half of the "Paradise Lost" is...

Page 189

...be made to spring from direct
causes--that objects should be attained through means best adapted for
their...

Page 190

...to produce continuously
novel effects, by the variation _of the application_ of the
_refrain_--the _refrain_ itself remaining,...

Page 191

...all points, I asked myself--"Of all
melancholy topics what, according to the _universal_ understanding of
mankind, is...

Page 192

...end where
all works of art should begin; for it was here at this point of...

Page 193

...a
half, the fifth the same, the sixth three and a half. Now, each of these
lines...

Page 194

...ludicrous
as was admissible--is given to the Raven's entrance. He comes in "with
many a flirt and...

Page 195

...gleams--the
chamber-window of a student, occupied half in pouring over a volume,
half in dreaming of a...

Page 196

...that has been
previously narrated. The reader begins now to regard the Raven as
emblematical--but it is...

Page 197

...old English muse was frank, guileless,
sincere and although very learned, still learned without art. No...

Page 198

...throughout all time.
Here everything is art, nakedly, or but awkwardly concealed. No
prepossession for the mere...

Page 199

...overgrown,
And lilies, that you would it guess
To be a little wilderness;
...

Page 200

...each wind. Then
consider the garden of "my own," so overgrown, entangled with roses and
lilies, as...