Poemas

By Edgar Allan Poe

Page 1

estrellas sobre el mundo, a la manera del
_fiat_ del Señor. Allí están entre todas, brillantes sobre las listas de
la bandera, las que iluminan el vuelo del águila de América, de esta tu
América formidable, de ojos azules. Ave, Libertad, llena de fuerza; el
Señor es contigo: bendita tú eres. Pero, ¿sabes?, se te ha herido mucho
por el mundo, divinidad, manchando tu esplendor. Anda en la tierra otra
que ha usurpado tu nombre, y que, en vez de la antorcha, lleva la tea.
Aquélla no es la Diana sagrada de las incomparables flechas: es Hécate.»

Hecha mi salutación, mi vista contempla la masa enorme que está al
frente, aquella tierra coronada de torres, aquella región de donde casi
sentís que viene un soplo subyugador y terrible: Manhattan, la isla de
hierro, Nueva York, la sanguínea, la ciclópea, la monstruosa, la
tormentosa, la irresistible capital del cheque. Rodeada de islas
menores, tiene cerca a Jersey; y agarrada a Brooklyn con la uña enorme
del puente, Brooklyn, que tiene sobre el palpitante pecho de acero un
ramillete de campanarios.

Se cree oír la voz de Nueva York, el eco de un vasto soliloquio de
cifras. ¡Cuán distinta de la voz de París, cuando uno cree escucharla,
al acercarse, halagadora como una canción de amor, de poesía y de
juventud! Sobre el suelo de Manhattan parece que va a verse surgir de
pronto un colosal Tío Samuel, que llama a los pueblos todos a un
inaudito remate, y que el martillo del rematador cae sobre cúpulas y
techumbres produciendo un ensordecedor trueno metálico. Antes de entrar
al corazón del monstruo, recuerdo la ciudad, que vio en el poema bárbaro
el vidente Thogorma:

_Thogorma dans ses yeux vit monter des murailles de fer dont
s'enroulaient des spirales des tours et des palais cerclés d'arain sur
des blocs lourds; ruche énorme, géhenne aux lúgubres entrailles oú
s'engouffraint les Forts, princes des anciens jours._

* * * * *

Semejantes a los Fuertes de los días antiguos, viven en sus torres de
piedra, de hierro y de cristal, los hombres de Manhattan.

En su fabulosa Babel, gritan, mugen, resuenan, braman, conmueven la
Bolsa, la locomotora, la fragua, el banco, la imprenta, el dock y la
urna electoral. El edificio Produce Exchange, entre sus muros de hierro
y granito, reúne tantas almas cuantas hacen un pueblo... He allí
Broadway. Se experimenta casi una impresión dolorosa; sentís el dominio
del vértigo. Por

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Text Comparison with The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 5

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Many of the women swooned with affright; and had not the king taken the precaution to exclude all weapons from the saloon, his party might soon have expiated their frolic in their blood.
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BON-BON.
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us on, by this tremulous light! Let us bathe in this crystalline light! Its Sybillic splendor is beaming With Hope and in Beauty to-night-- See!--it flickers up the sky through the night! Ah, we safely may trust to its gleaming, And be sure it will lead us aright-- We safely may trust to a gleaming That cannot but guide us aright, Since it flickers up to Heaven through the night.
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" 1847.
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Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering Eyes scintillating soul, there lie _perdus_ Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing Of poets, by poets--as the name is a poet's, too.
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"We rule the hearts of mightiest men--we rule "With a despotic sway all giant minds.
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DREAM-LAND BY a route obscure and lonely, Haunted by ill angels only, Where an Eidolon, named NIGHT, On a black throne reigns upright, I have reached these lands but newly From an ultimate dim Thule-- From a wild weird clime that lieth, sublime, Out of SPACE--out of TIME.
Page 157
Jewels! Jacinta,--now indeed, Jacinta, I thought not of the jewels.
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Be still!--it comes again! Voice "And is thy heart so strong (very faintly) As for to leave me thus Who hath loved thee so long In wealth and woe among? And is thy heart so strong As for to leave me thus? .
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Hal ha! Most welcome To Rome and to our palace, Earl Politian! And you, most noble Duke! I am glad to see you! I knew your father well, my Lord Politian.
Page 179
Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing? Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car? And driven the Hamadryad from the wood To seek a shelter in some happier star? Hast thous not torn the Naiad from her flood, The Elfin from the green grass, and from me The summer dream beneath the tamarind tree? AL AARAAF (*) PART I.
Page 184
--_Dr.
Page 198
--_Milton.
Page 226
IV Like music heard in dreams, Like strains of harps unknown, Of birds forever flown Audible as the voice of streams That murmur in some leafy dell, .