Eureka: A Prose Poem

By Edgar Allan Poe

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...EUREKA:
...

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... ...

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...Unity of the
First Thing lies the Secondary Cause of All Things, with the Germ of
their...

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...conclusions--the suggestions--the
speculations--or, if nothing better offer itself the mere guesses which
may result from it--we require...

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...of Transcendentalism
which, with the change merely of a C for a K, now bears his...

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...have any
thing to do either with _him_ or with his truths.

"Now, my dear friend," continues...

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...to talk about _certainty_,
when pursuing, in blind confidence, the _a priori_ path of axioms, or...

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...ready to grant that, _if_ an axiom _there
be_, then the proposition of which we speak...

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...axiomatic
truth? Thus all--absolutely _all_ his argumentation is at sea without a
rudder. Let it not be...

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...ardent imagination. These
latter--our Keplers--our Laplaces--'speculate'--'theorize'--these are the
terms--can you not fancy the shout of scorn with...

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...It is only _now_ that men begin to appreciate that divine old
man--to sympathize with the...

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...little obscure. But abstruseness is a quality
appertaining to no subject _per se_. All are alike,...

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...is not a question of two
statements between whose respective credibilities--or of two arguments
between whose respective...

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...the one case is the identical nothing which they
demonstrate in the other.

Of course, no one...

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...Deity has not
_designed_ it to be solved. He sees, at once, that it lies _out_...

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...essence of God:--in order to
comprehend what he is, we should have to be God ourselves."

"_We...

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...dint
of his Will, can by an infinitely less energetic exercise of the same
Will, as a...

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...of variety out of unity--diversity
out of sameness--heterogeneity out of homogeneity--complexity out of
simplicity--in a word, the...

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...leave _it_, the tendency, free to seek its
satisfaction. The Divine Act, however, being considered as...

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...The _design_ of
the repulsion--the necessity for its existence--I have endeavored to show;
but from all attempt...

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...are absolutely alike, is a simple
corollary from all that has been here said. Electricity, therefore,
existing...

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...respect of the _modus operandi_, at least, between
gravitation as known to exist and that seemingly...

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..."ocular and
physical proof"--in spite of the _character_ of this corroboration--the
ideas which even really philosophical men...

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...atom _at all_,
in a wilderness of atoms so numerous that those which go to the
composition...

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...complex:--it is the extremeness of the conditions to which I
now allude, rather than to the...

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...that each atom attracts each other atom and so forth, and
declares this merely; but (always...

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...no such thing)--but these
principles are clearly _not_ "ultimate;" in other terms what we are in
the...

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...of the treasure:--that
he did not find it after all, was, perhaps, because his fairy guide,
Imagination,...

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...same proportion as the squares of the
distances of the plane from the luminous body, are...

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...corollary from the evident design of infinite complexity of
relation out of irrelation. I started, it...

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...we aim. Moreover--I _feel_ that we shall discover _but
one_ possible solution of the difficulty; this...

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...itself upon the first; the number of atoms, in this
case as in the former, being...

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...the reaction of an act--as the expression of a desire on the part of
Matter, while...

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...condition, in respect to which the thing is wrong--and, still more
especially, if no beings, laws,...

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...sphere's centre--they can attain their true object, Unity.
In the direction of the centre each atom...

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...any stratum to its
position, been either more or less than was needed for the purpose--that
is...

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...which I have suggested for the atoms, is "an hypothesis and
nothing more."

Now, I am aware...

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...an hypothesis which we are required _to adopt_,
in order to admit the principle at issue...

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...idea founded
in the fluctuating principle, obviousness of relation--can possibly be so
secure--so reliable a basis for...

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...for believing in the original
finity of Matter is unempirically confirmed. For example:--Admitting, for
the moment, the...

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...there
arising, at once, (on withdrawal of the diffusive force, or Divine
Volition,) out of the condition...

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...of Neptune, the most remote
of our planets:--in other words, let us suppose the diameter of...

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...at a vast distance from
the latter.

Now, admitting the ring to have possessed, by some seemingly...

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...its equator, the Sun re-established that
equilibrium between its centripetal and centrifugal forces which had
been disturbed...

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...shrinking, until its sphere occupied just the space defined by the
orbit of the Asteroids, the...

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...the
condition in which we first considered him--from a partially spherified
nebular mass, _certainly_ much more than...

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..._Secondary_ Cause--a
solution of the phaenomenon of tangential velocity. This latter they
attribute directly to a _First_...

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...that _each law of Nature is dependent at all points upon
all other laws_, and that...

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...reject it. Here, then, as everywhere, _the Body and
the Soul walk hand in hand_.

...

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...suns_--that is to say, suns
whose existence we determine through the movements of others, but whose
luminosity...

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...impress me with all the force of truth--but I throw them out, of
course, merely in...

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...satisfactorily
account for them:--and as _no_ complexity can well be conceived greater
than that of the astronomical...

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...I refer. In a subsequent
Lecture, however, Dr. N. appears in some...

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...see them, for an inconceivable number of years. So far back _at
least_, then, as the...

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...the things that
are Caesar's, let me here remark that the assumption of the hypothesis
which led...

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...concentric circles; and looking as well at _them_ as at the
processes by which, according to...

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... even these latter again having moons.

Let us now, expanding our conceptions, look upon each...

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...first
and most obviously, on account of its great superiority in apparent
size, not only to any...

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...must not fall into the error, however, of conceiving the somewhat
indefinite girdle as at all...

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...looking _from_ the
Galaxy, we see in the general sky, are, in fact, but a portion...

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...any period, either after or before.
Independently of the consideration of these voids, however, and looking
only...

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...it more--that there _does_
exist a _limitless_ succession of Universes, more or less similar to
that of...

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...or the Sun
about the common centre--as circles in an accurate sense. They are, in
fact, _ellipses--one...

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...upon matter-of-fact, it is far too fashionable to sneer at
all speculation under the comprehensive _sobriquet_,...

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...without comprehending it
in the least, we may put it to use--mathematically. But in mentioning,
even, that...

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...our globe. Were this panorama, then, to be succeeded,
after the lapse of an hour, by...

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...of the
system taken together. This fact is an essential condition, indeed, of
the stability of the...

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...of course, we must expect to find rolling
through the widest vacancies of Space.

I remarked, just...

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...to the road, and from
the road to the horizon. Now, as we proceed along the...

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...our system from its brothers in the cluster to
which it belongs--astronomical science, until very lately,...

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...its
distance from us is _less_ than the average distance between star and
star in the magnificent...

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...that the stars
should be gathered into visibility from invisible nebulosity--proceed
from nebulosity to consolidation--and so grow...

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...of adaptation_.

The pleasure which we derive from any display of human ingenuity is in
the ratio...

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...to, come
to an end.

It is hardly worth while, perhaps, even to sneer at the reveries...

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...precisely all this
which he imagines in the case of the Galaxy. Admitting the thing to...

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...of this fact--the fact
of a curvature. For its _thorough_ determination, ages will be required;
and, when...

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... no great central orb exists _now_ in our cluster, such will
...

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...it is clear, nevertheless,
that this general rectilinearity would be compounded of what, with
scarcely any exaggeration,...

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...every
atom is _perpetually_ impelled to seek its fellow-atom. Never was
necessity less obvious than that of...

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...springs, instantly, from a superficial observation of the
cyclic and seemingly _gyrating_, or _vorticial_ movements of...

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...but, in such case, the principle of absorption
must be referred to eccentricity of orbit--to the...

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...light, magnetism; and
more--of vitality, consciousness, and thought--in a word, of spirituality.
It will be seen, at...

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...of aggregation:--and in
this direct drawing together of the systems into clusters, with a
similar and simultaneous...

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...It is
merely in the development of this Ether, through heterogeneity, that
particular masses of Matter become...

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...at length just sufficiently predominate[15]
and expel it:--when, I say, Matter, finally, expelling the Ether, shall
have...

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...we should
_not_ exist, is, _up to the epoch of our Manhood_, of all queries the...

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...joy of his
Existence; but just as it _is_ in your power to expand or to...

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...September.


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